MtGox/API/Streaming - Bitcoin Wiki

r/Bitcoin recap - March 2018

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the fifteenth monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
And a lot has happened. It's easy to forget with so much focus on the price. Take a moment and scroll through the list below. You'll find an incredibly eventful month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in March 2018
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A few days ago, I posted a picture of a Bitcoin ticker running on a Raspberry Pi LCD screen. Since a few people have asked, I wanted to post links to the screen and the code I wrote, released under a GNU license

Here is the screen for sale on Adafruit.com, which is really nice and readable in all lighting conditions:
http://www.adafruit.com/products/1110
And here is the tutorial that they provide for setting that screen up. Really clear and easy to follow:
http://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-16x2-character-lcd-plus-keypad-for-raspberry-pi/overview
Finally, here is the Python code I used for the ticker. It's quite simple really. The Adafruit LCD library does most of the heavy lifting, and I use the Requests library and standard JSON library to handle the API call. It should be pretty self-explanatory, but feel free to ask any questions you may have in the comments:
http://pastebin.com/DUT0GFZ4
I don't know much about licensing, but I think it's appropriate to release this under the GNU license. Do whatever you want with it. Enjoy!
submitted by itsalwayslulzy to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

I made a simple cryptocurrency asset price tracker called CoinWatch. Any feedback would be great. It's on the Apple App Store.

I made a simple cryptocurrency asset price tracker called CoinWatch. Any feedback would be great. It's on the Apple App Store. submitted by csolares23 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I made a quick little website to let people try out their quick bitcoin trading skills. How much BTC can you amass just by trading?

submitted by ILiftOnTuesdays to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Please provide an option to download a CSV file with the complete order history, for tax reporting purposes!

Please provide an option to download a CSV file with the complete order history, for tax purposes. Reporting crypto Tx's is necessary to be tax-compliant in the US, Europe and many other countries. Most large exchanges have such a feature, or they have an API that Tax-reporting apps can use.
The CSV file should be in a format that can be recognized by Crypto tax apps, e.g. http://bitcoin.tax , https://cointracking.info or https://taxtoken.io .
For example, bitcoin.tax format is:
The files must either contains the following fields or have these names in the header row:
For example:
Date,Action,Source,Symbol,Volume,Price,Currency,Fee
2014-01-01 13:00:00 -0800,BUY,Online,BTC,1,500,USD,5.50
submitted by loupiote2 to kucoin [link] [comments]

The simplest explanation is usually the right one (Occam's Razor): "Willy" was not a conspiracy. It was exactly what Mark Karpeles said it was: a bot/API for high value clients.

I'm a little surprised that so many people are jumping straight to conspiracy theories in the last 48 hours following the "Willy Report". It especially surprises me because Willy follows the exact same patterns that so many people here have theorized would be done by "whales".
Imagine you are a high value trader or company. You want to enter bitcoin or increase your position. Do you really think you would simply open up a regular trading account on MtGox, put millions of dollars into your web account, and start making million dollar trades? Absolutely no way. I've worked for two large Wall Street banks, and I can tell you flat out that high value clients have access to products and services that "normal" people do not. High value clients have dedicated staff to service them, they get taken out to dinners and events, they have exceptions done for them, they simply operate outside of the normal world that you and I live in.
Willy didn't pay fees or fiat because it operated outside the purview of what a normal trader would have to do. High value clients would have direct relationships with MtGox, and would likely have special fee structure in place that they would pay to MtGox separately and at a different time than trades. Willy didn't back up trades with fiat because fiat was likely wired to MtGox separately, in bulk.
Willy only bought because these high value clients weren't looking to really "trade". They were looking to enter the market, and likely couldn't find enough early adopters off-market to facilitate their needs. So, they had to go on-market. Second Market has publicly stated that they started having issues finding off-market individuals to buy from. What then? Just stop buying? Absolutely not. They instead needed to start coming on-market. However, you can't simply start making buy orders for several millions dollars. So instead, MtGox would offer an automated API that was directly connected to their servers (just like Mark said) and could make small buys at frequent intervals so as to try to not influence the market too much and cause the price to go skyrocketing.
Willy had "??" in data fields because Willy likely facilitated several different clients at once. There is no grand conspiracy there.
Again, I'm surprised that people aren't coming to these simple conclusions, especially since this is exactly how all of us have assumed "whales" work. What we're seeing in Willy is exactly what we expected to see in whales.
Also, does anyone really think that Willy, a bot that was a small percentage of MtGox's volume, could really single-handedly incite an entire bubble when there were at least 2 or 3 other similarly sized exchanges? The truth is that Willy was just one form of high value clients entering the market on one exchange. Other exchanges likely have their own forms of "Willies" that contributed to the bubble just like it did on MtGox. And trust me, those "Willies" are no more conspiratorial than this MtGox Willy is.
submitted by watabtme to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Blockchain Wallets

Hello! My name is Inna Halahuz, I am a sales manager at Platinum, the largest listing service provider for the STO and ICO projects. We know all about the best and most useful STO and ICO marketing services.
By the way, we developed the best blockchain platform:
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What a Blockchain Wallet is? What is its purpose?
Find the answer after reading this article.
Public/Private Key
The public key is the digital code you give to someone that wants to transfer ownership of a unit of cryptocurrency to you; and a private key is what you need to be able to unlock your own wallet to transfer a unit of a cryptocurrency to someone else. The encoding of information within a wallet is done by the private and public keys. That is the main component of the encryption that maintains the security of the wallet. Both keys function in simultaneous encryption systems called symmetric and asymmetric encryption. The former, alternatively known as private key encryption, makes use of the same key for encryption and decryption. The latter, asymmetric encryption, utilizes two keys, the public and private key, wherein a message-sender encrypts the message with the public key, and the recipient decodes it with their private key. The public key uses asymmetric algorithms that convert messages into an unreadable format. A person who possesses a public key can encrypt the message for a specific receiver.
Accessing wallets
Methods of wallet access vary depending on the type of wallet being used. Various types of currency wallets on an exchange will normally be accessed via the exchange’s entrance portal, normally involving a combination of a username/password and optionally, 2FA (Two factor authentication, which we explain in more detail later). Whereas hardware wallets need to be connected to an internet enabled device, and then have a pin code entered manually by the user in possession of the hardware wallet in order for access to be gained. Phone wallets are accessed through the device on which the wallet application has been downloaded. Ordinarily, a passcode and/or security pattern must be entered before entry is granted, in addition to 2FA for withdrawals.
Satoshi Nakamoto built the Satoshi client which evolved into Bitcoin in 2009. This software allowed users to create wallets and send money to other addresses. However, it proved to be a nightmarish user experience, with many transactions being sent to incorrect addresses and private keys being lost. The MtGox (Magic the Gathering Online exchange, named after the original intended use of the exchange) incident, which will be covered in greater detail later, serves as a reminder of the dangers present in the cryptosphere regarding security, and the need to constantly upgrade your defenses against all potential hacks. The resulting loss of 850k BTC is a still unresolved problem, weighing heavily on the victims and the markets at large. This caused a huge push for a constantly evolving and improving focus on security. Exchanges that developed later, and are thus considered more legitimate and secure, such as Gemini and Coinbase, put a much greater emphasis on vigilance as a direct result of the MtGox hacking incident. We also saw the evolution of wallet security into the physical realm with the creation of hardware wallets, most notable among them the Ledger and Trezor wallets.
Types of Wallets & Storage Methods
The simplest way to sift through the dozens of cryptocurrency storage methods available today, is to divide them up into digital and non-digital, software and hardware wallets. There are also less commonly used methods of storage of private keys, like paper wallets and brain wallets. We will examine them all at least briefly, because in the course of your interaction with cryptocurrencies and Blockchain technology, it is essential to master all the different types of hardware and software wallets. Another distinction must be made between hot wallets and cold wallets. A hot wallet is one that is connected to the internet, and a cold wallet is one that is not. Fun fact: The level below cold storage, deep cold storage has just recently been implemented by the Regal RA DMCC, a subsidiary of an internationally renowned gold trading company licensed in the Middle East. After having been granted a crypto trading license, Regal RA launched their “deep cold” storage solution for traders and investors, which offers the ability to store crypto assets in vaults deep below the Almas Tower in Dubai. This storage method is so secure that at no point is the vault connected to a network or the internet; meaning the owners of the assets can be sure that the private keys are known only to the rightful owners.
Lets take a quick look at specific features and functionality of varieties of crypto wallets. Software wallets: wallet applications installed on a laptop, desktop, phone or tablet. Web Wallets: A hot wallet by definition. Web Wallets are accessible through the web browser on your phone or computer. The most important feature to recognize about any kind of web wallet, is that the private keys are held and managed by a trusted third party. MyEtherWallet is the most commonly used non-exchange web wallet, but it can only be used to store Ethereum and ERC-20 tokens.
Though the avenue of access to MEW is through the web, it is not strictly speaking a web wallet, though this label will suffice for the time being. The MEW site gives you the ability to create a new wallet so you can store your ETH yourself. All the data is created and stored on your CPU rather than their servers. This makes MEW a hybrid kind of web wallet and desktop wallet. Exchange Wallets: A form of Web Wallet contained within an exchange. An exchange will hold a wallet for each individual variety of cryptocurrency you hold on that exchange. Desktop Wallets: A software program downloaded onto your computer or tablet hard drive that usually holds only one kind of cryptocurrency. The Nano Wallet (Formerly Raiwallet) and Neon wallet for storage of NEO and NEP-5 tokens are notable examples of desktop wallets Phone Wallets: These are apps downloaded onto a mobile phone that function in the same manner as a desktop wallet, but actually can hold many different kinds of cryptocurrency. The Eidoo Wallet for storing Ethereum and its associated tokens and Blockchain Wallet which currently is configured to hold BTC, ETH and Bitcoin Cash, are some of the most widely used examples.
Hardware wallets — LedgeTrezoAlternatives
Hardware wallets are basically physical pathways and keys to the unique location of your crypto assets on the Blockchain. These are thought to be more secure than any variety of web wallet because the private key is stored within your own hard wallet, an actual physical device. This forcibly removes the risk your online wallet, or your exchange counter party, might be hacked in the same manner as MtGox. In hardware wallet transactions, the wallet’s API creates the transaction when a user requests a payment. An API is a set of functions that facilitates the creation of applications that interact and access features or data of an operating system. The hardware then signs the transaction, and produces a public key, which is given to the network. This means the signing keys never leave the hardware wallet. The user must both enter a personal identification number and physically press buttons on the hardware wallet in order to gain access to their Blockchain wallet address through this method, and do the same to initiate transfers.
Paper Wallets
Possibly the safest form of cryptocurrency storage in terms of avoiding hacking, Paper Wallets are an offline form of crypto storage that is free to set up, and probably the most secure way for users, from beginners to experts, to hold on to their crypto assets. To say it simply, paper wallets are an offline cold storage method of storing cryptocurrency. This includes actually printing out your public and private keys on a piece of paper, which you then store and save in a secure place. The keys are printed in the form of QR codes which you can scan in the future for all your transactions. The reason why it is so safe is that it gives complete control to you, the user. You do not need to worry about the security or condition of a piece of hardware, nor do you have to worry about hackers on the net, or any other piece of malware. You just need to take care of one piece of paper!
Real World Historical Examples of Different Wallet Types
Web Wallet: Blockchain.info Brief mechanism & Security Blockchain.info is both a cryptocurrency wallet, supporting Bitcoin, Ethereum and Bitcoin cash, and also a block explorer service. The wallet service provided by blockchain.info has both a Web Wallet, and mobile phone application wallet, both of which involve signing up with an email address, and both have downloadable private keys. Two Factor Authentication is enabled for transfers from the web and mobile wallets, as well as email confirmation (as with most withdrawals from exchanges). Phone Wallet: Eidoo The Eidoo wallet is a multi-currency mobile phone app wallet for storage of Ethereum and ERC-20 tokens. The security level is the standard phone wallet level of email registration, confirmation, password login, and 2 factor authentication used in all transfers out. You may find small volumes of different varieties of cryptocurrencies randomly turning up in your Eidoo wallet address. Certain projects have deals with individual wallets to allow for “airdrops” to take place of a particular token into the wallet, without the consent of the wallet holder. There is no need to be alarmed, and the security of the wallet is not in any way compromised by these airdrops.
Neon Wallet
The NEON wallet sets the standard for web wallets in terms of security and user-friendly functionality. This wallet is only designed for storing NEO, Gas, and NEP-5 tokens (Ontology, Deep Brain Chain, RPX etc.). As with all single-currency wallets, be forewarned, if you send the wrong cryptocurrency type to a wallet for which it is not designed, you will probably lose your tokens or coins. MyEtherWallet My Ether Wallet, often referred to as MEW, is the most widely used and highly regarded wallet for Ethereum and its related ERC-20 tokens. You can access your MEW account with a hardware wallet, or a different program. Or you can also get access by typing or copying in your private key. However, you should understand this method is the least safe way possible,and therefore is the most likely to result in a hack. Hardware: TrezoLedger Brief History Mechanism and Security A hardware wallet is a physical key to your on-chain wallet location, with the private keys contained within a secure sector of the device. Your private key never leaves your hardware wallet. This is one of the safest possible methods of access to your crypto assets. Many people feel like the hardware wallet strikes the right balance between security, peace of mind, and convenience. Paper Wallet Paper wallets can be generated at various websites, such as https://bitcoinpaperwallet.com/ and https://walletgenerator.net/. They enable wallet holders to store their private keys totally offline, in as secure a manner as is possible.
Real World Example — Poor Practices
MtGox Hack history effects and security considerations MtGox was the largest cryptocurrency exchange in the world before it was hacked in 2014. They were handling over 70% of BTC transactions before they were forced to liquidate their business. The biggest theft of cryptocurrency in history began when the private keys for the hot wallets were stolen in 2011 from a wallet.dat file, possibly by hacking, possibly by a rogue employee. Over the course of the next 3 years the hot wallets were emptied of approximately 650000 BTC. The hacker only needed wallet.dat file to access and make transfers from the hot wallet, as wallet encryption was only in operation from the time of the Bitcoin 0.4.0 release on Sept 23rd 2011. Even as the wallets were being emptied, the employees at Mt Gox were apparently oblivious to what was taking place. It seems that Mt Gox workers were interpreting these withdrawals as large transfers being made to more secure wallets. The former CEO of the exchange, Mark Karpeles, is currently on trial for embezzlement and faces up to 5 years in prison if found guilty. The Mt Gox hack precipitated the acceleration of security improvements on other exchanges, for wallets, and the architecture of bitcoin itself. As a rule of thumb, no small-to-medium scale crypto holders should use exchange wallets as a long-term storage solution. Investors and experienced traders may do this to take advantage of market fluctuations, but exchange wallets are perhaps the most prone to hacking, and storing assets on exchanges for an extended time is one of the riskiest ways to hold your assets.
In a case strikingly similar to the MtGox of 2011–2014, the operators of the BitGrail exchange “discovered” that approximately 17 million XRB ($195 million worth in early 2018) were missing. The operators of the exchange were inexplicably still accepting deposits, long after they knew about the hack. Then they proceeded to block withdrawals from non-EU users. And then they even requested a hard fork of the code to restore the funds. This would have meant the entire XRB Blockchain would have had to accept all transactions from their first “invalid” transaction that were invalid, and rollback the ledger. The BitGrailexchange attempted to open operations in May 2018 but was immediately forced to close by order of the Italian courts. BitGrail did not institute mandatory KYC (Know your customer) procedures for their clients until after the theft had been reported, and allegedly months after the hack was visible. They also did not have 2 factor authentication mandatory for withdrawals. All big, and very costly mistakes.
Case Study: Good Practice Binance, the Attempted Hack
During the 2017 bull run, China-based exchange Binance quickly rose to the status of biggest altcoin exchange in the world, boasting daily volumes that surged to over $4 billion per day in late December. Unfortunately, this success attracted the attention of some crafty hackers. These hackers purchased domain names that were confusingly similar to “binance.com”. And then they created sufficiently convincing replica websites so they could phish traders for their login information. After obtaining this vital info, the scammers created API keys to place large buy orders for VIAcoin, an obscure, low volume digital currency. Those large buy orders spiked VIA’s price. Within minutes they traded the artificially high-priced VIA for BTC. Then they immediately made withdrawal requests from the hacked BTC wallets to wallets outside of the exchange. Almost a perfect fait accompli! But, Binance’s “automating risk management system” kicked in, as it should, and all withdrawals were temporarily suspended, resulting in a foiled hacking attempt.
Software Wallets Web/Desktop/Phone/Exchange Advantages and Limitations
As we said before, it is inadvisable to store crypto assets in exchange wallets, and, to a lesser extent, Web Wallets. The specific reason we say that is because you need to deliver your private keys into the hands of another party, and rely on that website or exchange to keep your private key, and thus your assets, safe. The advantages of the less-secure exchange or web wallets, are the speed at which you can transfer assets into another currency, or into another exchange for sale or for arbitrage purposes. Despite the convenience factor, all software wallets will at some point have been connected to the internet or a network. So, you can never be 100% sure that your system has not been infected with malware, or some kind of keylogging software, that will allow a third party to record your passwords or private keys. How well the type of storage method limits your contact with such hazards is a good way to rate the security of said variety of wallet. Of all the software wallets, desktop and mobile wallets are the most secure because you download and store your own private key, preferably on a different system. By taking the responsibility of private key storage you can be sure that only one person has possession of it, and that is you! Thereby greatly increasing the security of your crypto assets. By having their assets in a desktop wallet, traders can guard their private key and enjoy the associated heightened security levels, as well keep their assets just one swift transfer away from an exchange.
Hardware Wallets Advantages and Limitations
We briefly touched on the features and operation of the two most popular hardware wallets currently on the market, the Ledger and Trezor wallets. Now it will be helpful to take a closer look into the pros and cons of the hardware wallet storage method. With hardware wallets, the private keys are stored within a protected area of the microcontroller, and they are prevented from being exported out of the device in plain text. They are fortified with state-of-the-art cryptography that makes them immune to computer viruses and malware. And much of the time, the software is open source, which allows user validation of the entire performance of the device. The advantages of a hardware wallet over the perhaps more secure paper wallet method of crypto storage is the interactive user experience, and also the fact that the private key must at some stage be downloaded in order to use the paper wallet. The main disadvantage of a hardware wallet is the time-consuming extra steps needed to transfer funds out of this mode of storage to an exchange, which could conceivably result in some traders missing out on profits. But with security being the main concern of the vast majority of holders, investors and traders too, this slight drawback is largely inconsequential in most situations.
Paper Wallets Advantages and Limitations
Paper wallets are thought by some to be the safest way to store your crypto assets, or more specifically, the best method of guarding the pathways to your assets on the Blockchain. By printing out your private key information, the route to your assets on the Blockchain is stored 100% offline (apart from the act of printing the private key out, the entire process is totally offline). This means that you will not run the risk of being infected with malware or become the victim of keylogging scams. The main drawback of using paper wallets is that you are in effect putting all your eggs in one basket, and if the physical document is destroyed, you will lose access to your crypto assets forever.
Key things to keep in mind about your Wallet Security: Recovery Phrases/Private Key Storage/2FA/Email Security
Recovery phrases are used to recover the on-chain location for your wallet with your assets for hardware wallets like ledgers and Trezors that have been lost. When you purchase a new ledger for example, you just have to set it up again by entering the recovery phrase into the display and the lost wallets will appear with your assets intact. Private key storage is of paramount importance to maintain the safety of your on-chain assets! This should be done in paper wallet form, or stored offline on a different computer, or USB device, from the one you would typically use to connect to the 2 Factor Authentication (2FA) sometimes known as “two step authentication”. This feature offers an extra security layer when withdrawing funds from cryptocurrency wallets. A specialized app, most commonly Google Authenticator, is synced up to the exchange to provide a constantly changing code. This code must be entered within a short time window to initiate transfers, or to log into an exchange, if it has also been enabled for that purpose.
You must always consider the level of fees, or the amount of Gas, that will be needed to carry out the transaction. In times of high network activity Gas prices can be quite high. In fact, in December 2017 network fees became so high that some Bitcoin transactions became absolutely unfeasible. But that was basically due to the anomalous network congestion caused by frantic trading of Bitcoin as it was skyrocketing in value. When copying wallet addresses, double check and triple check that they are correct. If you make a mistake and enter an incorrect address, it is most likely your funds will be irretrievably lost; you will never see those particular assets again. Also check that you haven’t input the address of another one of your wallets that is designed to hold a different variety of cryptocurrency. You would similarly run the very great risk of losing your funds forever. Or, at the very least, if you have sent the wrong crypto to a large exchange wallet, for example on Coinbase, maybe you could eventually get those funds back, but it would still entail a long and unenjoyable wait.
How to Monitor Funds
There are two ways to monitor you funds and your wallets. The first is by searching for individual wallet addresses on websites specifically designed to let you view all the transactions on a particular Blockchain. The other is to store a copy of your wallet contents on an application that tracks the prices of all cryptocurrencies. Blockchain.info is the block explorer for Bitcoin, and it allows you to track all wallet movements so you can view your holdings and all the historical transactions within the wallet. The Ethereum blockchain’s block explorer is called Ether scanner, and it functions in the same way. There is a rival to Ether scanner produced by the Jibrel Network, called JSearch which will be released soon. JSearch will aim to offer a more streamlined and faster search method for Ethereum blockchain transactions. There are many different kinds of block explorer for each individual crypto currency, including nanoexplorer.io for Nano (formerly Rai Blocks) and Neotracker for NEO. If you simply want to view the value of your portfolio, the Delta and Blockfolio apps allow you to easily do that. But they are not actually linked to your specific wallet address, they just show price movements and total value of the coins you want to monitor.
That’s not all! You can learn how to transfer and monitor the funds in and out of your wallet by clicking on the link.
To be continued!
UBAI.co
Contact me via Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn to learn more about the best online education:
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submitted by UBAI_UNIVERSITY to u/UBAI_UNIVERSITY [link] [comments]

Peter R’s Theory on the Collapse of Mt. Gox

TL/DR: A young man had a secret. To keep it hidden, he kept digging until the hole was a billion dollars deep. This is a speculative tale of a great bitcoin theft from MtGox in 2011 and the efforts that this man undertook to fix it. The tale explains the bitcoin bear market of 2011, the explosive rally of 2013, delayed fiat withdrawals, malled transactions, and a bot named Willy.
By the time you realize that real life has begun, you are already three moves in.”—Author unknown
It was June 19, 2011. Mark, a 26 year-old young man—a boy really—was ecstatic. He had recently purchased MtGox—a small, online exchange for trading virtual tokens—and business was booming. These virtual tokens were called bitcoins and Mark loved them.
Bitcoins were an obscure curiosity: a peer-to-peer electronic cash system that allowed users to store and exchange credits with any other user in the world, nearly instantly, and without the assistance of a third-party or the permission of an authority. All that was needed was a 78-digit secret number—a key if you will.
In order for his customers to withdraw their bitcoins over the internet, MtGox stored some of these keys on its online server. The remaining keys were stored on USB drives and backed up on paper to prevent theft should the server be compromised.
But theft was hardly a concern. In October of 2010, bitcoins were trading for $0.10 and the half a million bitcoins held by MtGox was worth only $50,000. But still Mark took precautions, diligently moving bitcoins to offline storage and leaving only what was necessary for customer withdrawals online. He truly wanted both his business and bitcoin to succeed.
By April, the bitcoin price had risen to $1 and by June it had exploded to $30. Between June 1 and June 15, an additional one million bitcoins were sent to MtGox and immediately sold, crashing the price back to $10. It was a hectic time, with hundreds of customers needing help, visits from the FBI related to the Silk Road black market, and stress related to the recent market crash. Young Mark was becoming a victim of his own success: there simply wasn’t enough time to get everything done. On this very day in June 2011, the keys to the recently-deposited 1,000,000 BTC were still sitting on his server.
Later this day, a group of hackers gained access to MtGox servers and executed fake trades that the world could see, driving the nominal price of bitcoin near $0. Mark was frantic. He quickly regained control of the servers and learned the dark truth: the million bitcoins that had recently flooded in earlier that month were gone. Mark admitted publically to the hack, rewound the false trades, but kept the truth of the missing coins a secret.
How could this 26-year old explain to his customers that he had lost their bitcoins? And if the world found out, would this kill the thing he loved so dearly? Would he go to jail? Or worse yet, would someone kill him? Mark decided that he would do what he thought was right: he would slowly earn back the lost bitcoin with MtGox trading fee profits and eventually make his customers whole again. He still had over 500,000 BTC left—he moved 424242.42424242 BTC between bitcoin addresses and convinced the community that MtGox was solvent. As long as withdrawals didn’t exceed deposits over a long period of time, no one would ever find out the truth. Or so he thought.
Meanwhile, the bitcoin thieves slowly mixed their coins with other coins, obfuscating the chain of ownership, and then re-selling these coins on MtGox using sock-puppet accounts. Mark tried to stop them, but there was no way he could know for sure which accounts were fraudulent—he even accused innocent people of bitcoin laundering. The constant selling of these stolen bitcoins drove the price down to $2 in November 2011. Mark faithfully used all of the MtGox profits to purchase coins back during this decline. But he would never use customer funds—that was a line he swore not to cross.
The selling of these stolen bitcoins continued at a diminished rate over 2012, and Mark continually purchased coins using the MtGox trading fees. The bitcoin economy was growing and new exchanges were opening up across the world. His bitcoin reserves weren’t building fast enough but the price of bitcoin kept rising (along with the dollar value of the missing bitcoins). He was worried that other exchanges would suck coins out of Gox and reveal his secret. He decided he needed to take decisive action: for the first time, he used customer funds to purchase real bitcoins. These large purchases by Mark further increased demand and ignited the great rally of spring 2013 when the bitcoin price shot from $20 to $266. Mark had reduced his liability in bitcoins, but in dollar terms the coins that were still missing were worth more than ever before.
On May 15, 2013 the US Department of Homeland Security seized millions of dollars from the MtGox Dwolla bank account. MtGox dollar reserves were already depleted at this point, and with the recent seizure, Mark could no longer make good on customer withdrawals in US dollars.
Under the guise of “banking problems,” MtGox slowed US dollar withdrawals to a trickle in the summer of 2013. Customers became increasingly worried and began to bid up the price of bitcoin on MtGox, as this was the only way to escape with their funds. MtGox had little fiat and very little bitcoins, but it learned one thing: as the price differential between Gox and BitStamp grew, the outwards flow of bitcoin slowed dramatically.
And so Willy was born. Willy was a bot, discovered by Wall Observers from bitcointalk.org and named by Opet on Bonavest's trading show, who would consistently purchased bitcoins at regular intervals between November 2013 and February 2014. Evidence that Willy belonged to Mark was revealed when both web and API trading at Gox was disabled for a brief period of time, exposing Willy as the only one left buying.
Willy served two purposes: he drove the price of bitcoin on the MtGox exchange high, thereby slowing and sometimes reversing the outward flow of real BTC, and he reduced the number of GoxBTC held by clients. Of course, this meant that Willy eventually became the owner of a huge number of GoxBTC (that were of course no longer backed by real BTC).
By December, the situation at MtGox was grim. In a desperate attempt to attract more funds, Mark offered reduced trading fees under the guise of celebrating their 1,000,000th customer. This partially worked, but Mark knew it was too late. If MtGox collapsed, it must appear that he didn’t know about the theft until now—for it was better to appear incompetent than criminal.
It was time to cover his tracks.
He purposely mixed immature coins into bitcoin withdrawals to delay the outward flow of coins, and later began malling his own transactions. He added the Gox malleability weakness not as a bug, but as a feature, so that it would seem plausible that outsiders had recently stolen the coins without his awareness. No coins were actually lost to malleability.
The MtGox coin supply dwindled to 2,000 BTC and on February 7, 2014. He had no choice but to disable bitcoin withdrawals. The end was near.
The problem Mark faced was that his customers had $150,000,000 credited to their accounts, yet the MtGox bank account only contained $38,000,000. He could blame the missing bitcoins on transaction malleability, but how could he explain where the fiat money went?
He shifted Willy into reverse and cranked the throttle. Willy relentlessly dumped bitcoins into the open bids. The price fell further and further, eventually dropping well below the BitStamp price. But still not enough people were buying! He needed his customers to buy the GoxBTC. Willy kept dumping coins until finally the price dropped below $100. MtGox even acquired new USD bank wires from customers looking to purchase the cheap coins. By this time, the majority of Gox customers had converted their dollars into bitcoins.
On February 28, 2014, Mt Gox filed for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo, reporting 6.5 billion yen in liabilities, 3.8 billion yen in assets, and 750,000 of customer bitcoins missing. Willy had failed to completely close the fiat solvency gap and Mark finally admitted to having lost the coins.
Now we watch the rest of the story unfold. A story of how an oversight during a hectic period, an untimely theft, and an attempt to cover it up, lead to the greatest loss in the history of bitcoin.
Cross-posted from: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=497289.0
submitted by Peter__R to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Bitcoin top posts from 2017-10-15 to 2018-10-14 18:01 PDT

Period: 364.20 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 265073
Rate (per day) 2.75 722.33
Unique Redditors 812 63529
Combined Score 3662639 3145604

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 74796 points, 2 submissions: Tricky_Troll
    1. The last 3 months in 47 seconds. (48474 points, 790 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Doesn't Give a Fuck. (26322 points, 1505 comments)
  2. 50907 points, 3 submissions: LeeWallis
    1. It's official! 1 Bitcoin = $10,000 USD (48506 points, 4587 comments)
    2. It's official! 1 Bitcoin = $10,000 USD (again) (1233 points, 123 comments)
    3. Bitcoin just reached $7,000 USD on GDAX! (1168 points, 359 comments)
  3. 49298 points, 2 submissions: chronic_nervosa
    1. Working Hard or Hardly Working? (25721 points, 326 comments)
    2. Investing Tips from a Pro (23577 points, 598 comments)
  4. 44144 points, 2 submissions: wolfwolfz
    1. It's over 9000!!! (42429 points, 3170 comments)
    2. Mtgox caused 2013 and 2018 crash (1715 points, 425 comments)
  5. 42048 points, 1 submission: buttockpain
    1. Everyone who's trading BTC right now (42048 points, 804 comments)
  6. 41614 points, 3 submissions: PineappleFund
    1. I'm donating 5057 BTC to charitable causes! Introducing The Pineapple Fund (20020 points, 2927 comments)
    2. Farewell from the Pineapple Fund (10944 points, 610 comments)
    3. 🍍 $4mil will fund MDMA trials for PTSD; marked 'Breakthrough Therapy' by FDA. Pineapple Fund is matching MAPS donations 1:1. Reddit, let's make history by crowdfunding an incredible treatment for PTSD, in bitcoin! (10650 points, 558 comments)
  7. 41269 points, 4 submissions: Xtreme110
    1. Bitcoin.. The King (28328 points, 1178 comments)
    2. So here's what actually happened Today. (8542 points, 301 comments)
    3. So Yeah This Happened .. (2330 points, 215 comments)
    4. Did someone Asked for Support levels... (2069 points, 224 comments)
  8. 29323 points, 1 submission: KINNAHZ
    1. I hope James is doing well (29323 points, 1242 comments)
  9. 29123 points, 1 submission: trance929
    1. Weeeeeeee! (29123 points, 1530 comments)
  10. 28063 points, 1 submission: benjaminikuta
    1. Nothing can increase by that much and still be a good investment. (28063 points, 1318 comments)
  11. 27600 points, 5 submissions: Suberg
    1. Rabobank Fined $369M for Money Laundering After Calling Bitcoin a Risk for Money Laundering (14264 points, 312 comments)
    2. Ellen DeGeneres Just Introduced Bitcoin to Her 3 Million US Viewers (7893 points, 619 comments)
    3. Evidence Emerges of CNBC Collusion with Roger Ver, BCash (2665 points, 526 comments)
    4. Reminder: Encrypt and store your bitcoin offline - U.S. Congress Quietly Passes CLOUD Act to Increase Gov't Access to Online Info (1688 points, 277 comments)
    5. 600+ Bitcoin Users Seek Lawsuit Against Bitcoin.com & CEO Roger Ver for Fraud (1090 points, 298 comments)
  12. 26949 points, 1 submission: Kittstar123
    1. This is why I want bitcoin to hit $10,000 (26949 points, 918 comments)
  13. 24897 points, 2 submissions: sunilross
    1. What he would be wishing now? 😂 (22418 points, 954 comments)
    2. Just a few months ago Bitcoin going to $10,000 was a huge celebration Now Bitcoin is at $10,000 and its like the end of the world. What an irony!! (2479 points, 1016 comments)
  14. 24555 points, 8 submissions: TheGreatMuffin
    1. This Bitcoin chart is insane! Oh, wait… that’s actually a chart of US dollar money printing. (8202 points, 1165 comments)
    2. Coinbase Hit With Class Action Claiming Insiders Benefited From 'Bitcoin Cash' Launch (5370 points, 493 comments)
    3. "Anonymous bitcoin donor rains $56 million on stunned nonprofits" (story about The Pinapple Fund) (3331 points, 199 comments)
    4. Odds of winning Powerball (Lottery) vs guessing one bitcoin private key (by @Coinguybri) (2008 points, 260 comments)
    5. Andreas Antonopoulos' depiction of the day he became aware of the donations that made him a millionaire (1878 points, 214 comments)
    6. McAfee doubles down on his promise: "I now predict Bitcoin at $1 million by the end of 2020. I will still eat my dick if wrong." (1387 points, 329 comments)
    7. Federal courts now accepting cryptocurrency for bail (1288 points, 62 comments)
    8. The first Stable version of BTCPay is out: BTCPayServer 1.0.1.1 and NBXplorer 1.0.1.3. Next stable version will include Lightning Network. (by Nicolas Dorier) (1091 points, 103 comments)
  15. 23962 points, 6 submissions: Mobilenewsflash
    1. Difference between New and Experienced Trader (11900 points, 181 comments)
    2. Did you know? I didn't. (4127 points, 294 comments)
    3. Altcoin Master (3555 points, 145 comments)
    4. All we need is this kind of bull run! (2125 points, 122 comments)
    5. Bitcoin isn't the bubble, it's the pin (1199 points, 310 comments)
    6. Simple answer, the right one (1056 points, 230 comments)
  16. 23651 points, 3 submissions: UniqueUsername642
    1. Cheers! (17238 points, 510 comments)
    2. This is Cryptocurrency (5072 points, 371 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Investors be like (1341 points, 335 comments)
  17. 23082 points, 1 submission: jrs0080
    1. Whoever put this up deserves a medal (23082 points, 319 comments)
  18. 23066 points, 1 submission: vindico_silenti
    1. BTC dropping due to lack of quality 11k memes. Closest support line is at 9k Vegeta memes. (23066 points, 820 comments)
  19. 22856 points, 1 submission: danielwilson666
    1. Bitcoin today (22856 points, 1940 comments)
  20. 22657 points, 1 submission: byte_coder
    1. 2018: lets run for office (22657 points, 991 comments)
  21. 22193 points, 1 submission: Hync
    1. Lily Allen turned down 200K in Bitcoins for a gig in 2009 which is worth $1,426,199,000 as of this writing (22193 points, 1293 comments)
  22. 21505 points, 1 submission: paperraincoat
    1. Eleven! (21505 points, 575 comments)
  23. 21044 points, 1 submission: SotakuKun
    1. How To Invest In Bitcoin (21044 points, 634 comments)
  24. 20817 points, 1 submission: MichKOG
    1. Almost everyone now is an Investor (20817 points, 554 comments)
  25. 20647 points, 10 submissions: Bastiat
    1. Day 2: I will repost this guide daily until available solutions like Segwit & order batching are adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and transaction fees are low. You can help. Take action today (5145 points, 766 comments)
    2. Pierre Rochard: "Until your altcoin successfully defeats a coordinated attack like NYA/S2X, with 90% of the hashrate and major businesses trying to force a hard fork, its immutability is untested and its monetary policy is suspect. Bitcoin has earned its keep, its immutability is beyond question" (2249 points, 345 comments)
    3. Day 9: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit, order batching, and Lightning payment channels are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and tx fees are low. Have you done your part? (2070 points, 190 comments)
    4. Day 5: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit & order batching are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and transaction fees are low. User demand from this community can help lead to some big changes. Have you joined the /Bitcoin SegWit effort? (2017 points, 268 comments)
    5. Day 7: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit & order batching are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and tx fees are low. Do you want low tx fees, because this is how you get low tx fees (1959 points, 166 comments)
    6. Day 3: I will repost this guide daily until available solutions like SegWit & order batching are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and transaction fees are low. ARE YOU PART OF THE SOLUTION? News: Unconfirmed TX's @ 274K, more exchanges adding SegWit, Core prioritizes SegWit GUI (1758 points, 220 comments)
    7. Coinbase's short-sighted money grab is @Gemini.com's gain. Trust is the number one concern for new adopters and nobody can trust CONBASE after today (1689 points, 383 comments)
    8. Day 8: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit, order batching, and Lightning payment channels are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and tx fees are low. BTC Core SegWit GUI coming May 1, Coinbase incompetence exposed, more exchanges deploy SegWit (1454 points, 177 comments)
    9. Day 6: I will post this guide regularly until available solutions like SegWit & order batching are mass adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and tx fees are low. Refer a friend to SegWit today. There's no $10 referral offer, but you'll both get lower fees and help strengthen the BTC protocol (1193 points, 99 comments)
    10. If every Bitcoin tx was a SegWit tx today, we'd have 8,000 tx blocks & the tx backlog would disappear. Tx fees would be almost non-existent once again. THE NEXT BITCOIN TX YOU MAKE, MAKE IT A SEGWIT TX. DOWNLOAD A SEGWIT COMPATIBLE WALLET AND OPEN A SEGWIT COMPATIBLE EXCHANGE ACCOUNT RIGHT NOW (1113 points, 228 comments)
  26. 20159 points, 1 submission: swahlgren
    1. Danish Bitcoin billionaire new sponsor of professional Danish ice hockey team. Stadium to be renamed "Bitcoin Arena" and get a huge Bitcoin logo in the middle of the ice! (20159 points, 1018 comments)
  27. 20119 points, 4 submissions: bitchari
    1. Value is always in the eyes of the beholder (10999 points, 542 comments)
    2. We did it!! BTC ✌️ (4335 points, 333 comments)
    3. Uncomfortable truths!! (3228 points, 451 comments)
    4. "rat poison" returns!! (1557 points, 234 comments)
  28. 19767 points, 1 submission: Active2017
    1. $7,900+!! (am i doing this right?) (19767 points, 493 comments)
  29. 18709 points, 1 submission: JonathanMauri
    1. Sold some bitcoin to buy my new best bud 🤗 (18709 points, 1752 comments)
  30. 17979 points, 1 submission: crlxzzz
    1. Localbitcoins.com is illegally holding my 9.3 bitcoin on "escrow" since may 2015 (17979 points, 802 comments)
  31. 17806 points, 6 submissions: domelane
    1. FORBES: "South Korea Is Not Banning Bitcoin Trade, Financial Regulators Clarify". (8349 points, 245 comments)
    2. Banks vs Bitcoin (2370 points, 311 comments)
    3. Arizona Senate Votes to Accept Tax Payments in Bitcoin (2363 points, 134 comments)
    4. Visa confirms Coinbase wasn’t at fault for overcharging users (1854 points, 92 comments)
    5. Finally! Coinbase: "Our engineering team has finished testing of SegWit for Bitcoin on Coinbase. We will be starting a phased launch to customers over the next few days and are targeting a 100% launch to all customers by mid next week". (1501 points, 112 comments)
    6. For all the newbies posting: "Bitcoin will crash on Monday! Wall Street is buying to short it to hell!", watch Andreas (Member of the Oversight Board of the CME Futures) to calm your tits. (1369 points, 322 comments)
  32. 17749 points, 2 submissions: BluntLord
    1. possibly the worst thing about this crash... (11631 points, 2540 comments)
    2. Reasons why these price increases are NOT a good thing. no FUD, all facts. (6118 points, 394 comments)
  33. 17228 points, 1 submission: ma_Name_Is_Jefffff
    1. To the new guys, let's see how tough you really are (17228 points, 1371 comments)
  34. 17117 points, 4 submissions: ayanamirs
    1. Don't be this guy (11774 points, 728 comments)
    2. Satoshi Nakamoto about bitcoin.com (2337 points, 313 comments)
    3. SegWit transactions are now 30.71%! (1892 points, 198 comments)
    4. SegWit, Lightning Network, and Schnorr are way more important than the current price. (1114 points, 166 comments)
  35. 16889 points, 1 submission: bitnext
    1. There are 180 different scenarios where bitcoin go. If any one thing happens remember me i am the first one to predict this (16889 points, 452 comments)
  36. 16350 points, 1 submission: YetAnotherCryptoFan
    1. Warren Buffet: (16350 points, 990 comments)
  37. 16128 points, 1 submission: lewjc
    1. Quick analysis of the markets this month (16128 points, 349 comments)
  38. 15721 points, 1 submission: bitiegg
    1. Guys... I'm out... (15721 points, 814 comments)
  39. 15216 points, 1 submission: CryptoCurrencyFreak
    1. The Free Software Foundation has received a 91.45 Bitcoin donation from the Pineapple Fund. Valued at $1 Million USD. (15216 points, 423 comments)
  40. 15144 points, 4 submissions: StoneHammers
    1. exceedingly efficient (7954 points, 205 comments)
    2. Behold my 20 Bitcoin lawnmower bought mid 2012 (4214 points, 289 comments)
    3. This could change everything (1900 points, 68 comments)
    4. Bitcoin today (1076 points, 114 comments)
  41. 14847 points, 1 submission: cryptograffiti
    1. Upvote to get this to the top search result for "Bitcoin CEO." (14847 points, 265 comments)
  42. 14823 points, 6 submissions: Bitzone4
    1. Mood Currently. (6084 points, 448 comments)
    2. Hodlers currently (2882 points, 314 comments)
    3. Lets goooo yes bitcoin (2362 points, 280 comments)
    4. Holders Power (1444 points, 160 comments)
    5. Meanwhile when there's blood in the street. (1032 points, 106 comments)
    6. Who else took the discount opportunity? (1019 points, 209 comments)
  43. 14808 points, 1 submission: ltc-
    1. What a time to be alive! (14808 points, 467 comments)
  44. 14807 points, 1 submission: nrckprth
    1. When you are trying to buy the dip (14807 points, 660 comments)
  45. 14761 points, 2 submissions: zackwong97
    1. Quick grab the offer! (12316 points, 835 comments)
    2. 100 years has past and a new currency was discovered. I believe cryptocurrency can save the world. (2445 points, 221 comments)
  46. 14624 points, 1 submission: lawmaster99
    1. Microsoft joins Steam and stops accepting Bitcoin payments (14624 points, 2163 comments)
  47. 14236 points, 1 submission: kixxaxxas
    1. Yeah! Bitcoin! (14236 points, 496 comments)
  48. 13950 points, 1 submission: EaFaer
    1. Us Senate Bill S.1241 to criminalize concealed ownership of Bitcoin (13950 points, 1621 comments)
  49. 13929 points, 7 submissions: finalhedge
    1. Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak: “Bitcoin is mathematical. I am a mathematician. There are only 21 million. It is more legitimate than other systems” (3984 points, 487 comments)
    2. Mum knows best (2474 points, 149 comments)
    3. Wall Street Journal has gone from worrying that Bitcoin is a bubble that will crash, to worrying that it's not (2432 points, 440 comments)
    4. Hedge Fund Manager Mark Yusko: "Only gamble was whether Bitcoin would make if from $0 to $100-- that was the real miracle. Going from $4,000 to $400,000 is easy" (1755 points, 272 comments)
    5. Those who scoffed at the thought of $1,000 BTC are scoffing at $10,000 BTC and will scoff at $100,000 BTC (1163 points, 342 comments)
    6. Barry Silbert could make Bitcoin soar to $7,000+ & his own Assets Under Management to $1.5B+ with 1 tweet: call off SegWit2X & uncertainty will be out of the market. (1074 points, 189 comments)
    7. Google gets it. (1047 points, 46 comments)
  50. 13912 points, 4 submissions: readish
    1. Bitcoin is going to do to banks what email did the post office and Amazon did to retail. (7194 points, 1137 comments)
    2. ... hey, Coinbase... (3293 points, 492 comments)
    3. Yes, please! (2342 points, 325 comments)
    4. Calling Bitcoin Cash the "real" Bitcoin is straightforward fraud, and will financially wreck many new investors entering the ecosystem by buying a fake coin. So, exposing frauds is a nice thing to do for other people to prevent them from falling for those scams. (1083 points, 400 comments)
  51. 13876 points, 1 submission: theymos
    1. Don't invest recklessly (13876 points, 1972 comments)
  52. 13839 points, 1 submission: virtualwoman0
    1. Thank you Coinbase!! For taking sooo long to validate my identity, my account, and my bank transfers...your endless delays prevented me from investing in the crypto market before the crash! (13839 points, 556 comments)
  53. 13817 points, 2 submissions: xcryptogurux
    1. Don't be like Greg (9887 points, 370 comments)
    2. Lesson - History of Bitcoin crashes (3930 points, 1676 comments)
  54. 13546 points, 2 submissions: D3M0Sthenes
    1. Can you feel the Pumpening? (12469 points, 436 comments)
    2. There's always that guy at the party (1077 points, 61 comments)
  55. 13507 points, 2 submissions: pc_to_mac_user
    1. Keeping Coinbase on their toes - Robinhood adds no-fee crypto trading! (12040 points, 909 comments)
    2. Coinbase CEO: In the next 3–5 years, you will see countries going into economic crisis and could see the organic adoption of cryptocurrencies (1467 points, 363 comments)
  56. 13489 points, 3 submissions: Godfreee
    1. It was a sad day when we had to retire this meme from our wall after 3.5 years. Next one will have an added zero! (10196 points, 237 comments)
    2. Back in 2013, a single subway sandwich shop accepting Bitcoin got airtime on CNBC, and we were all jumping for joy. Nowadays we get full TV features about Bitcoin and people are like " yawn, could be better". (2020 points, 110 comments)
    3. This magazine cover came out exactly 30 years ago - same day Bitcoin was released 9 years ago. Was Satoshi that meta? 2018 is gonna be a helluva ride. (1273 points, 301 comments)
  57. 13293 points, 2 submissions: ccjunkiemonkey
    1. Sixty free lectures from Princeton on bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. Total time 13hr 20min. Links in post. (12259 points, 206 comments)
    2. Don't panic, just learn. Sixty free lectures from Princeton on bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. Total time 13hr 20min. Links in post. (1034 points, 97 comments)
  58. 12875 points, 1 submission: DebtFreeMFers
    1. Guys, I am out (12875 points, 1572 comments)
  59. 12651 points, 1 submission: lriccardo
    1. I spent 3 months building one of the best apps to track cryptocurrencies. Exchanges API sync, wallet tracking and many other features. I am not 16 but I invested a lot of time into this, can I get some attention anyway or am I going to get randomly downvoted as always? The app is also free. (12651 points, 1563 comments)
  60. 12558 points, 3 submissions: agent9747
    1. How to transfer Bitcoin from Coinbase for free! (10322 points, 809 comments)
    2. Stop hating on Coinbase (1210 points, 563 comments)
    3. My Cryptocurrency app is starting to look good :D It will be available soon-ish (1026 points, 193 comments)
  61. 12489 points, 1 submission: tune_down
    1. Insider tip: BTC is going to skyrocket in the next 48 hours (12489 points, 741 comments)
  62. 12328 points, 1 submission: i_mash_shoryuken
    1. This month in Bitcoin. (12328 points, 371 comments)
  63. 12069 points, 1 submission: Ev1lyv35
    1. This hurts me in a different level. (12069 points, 593 comments)
  64. 11898 points, 4 submissions: tinaclark90
    1. I've made some free Bitcoin Icons (4747 points, 246 comments)
    2. Thought I might share this in here. No way Bitcoin is going to survive folks... (4657 points, 824 comments)
    3. New Free Bitcoin Icons (1285 points, 71 comments)
    4. Bitcoin Icons (100% Free) (1209 points, 64 comments)
  65. 11618 points, 1 submission: timbroddin
    1. 9 years ago block 0 was mined. Happy birthday Bitcoin! (11618 points, 455 comments)
  66. 11429 points, 1 submission: tomerux
    1. We waited for that... (11429 points, 186 comments)
  67. 11381 points, 1 submission: sykhlo
    1. And that's why we need limited supply. (11381 points, 803 comments)
  68. 11357 points, 2 submissions: sbrdx
    1. Bitcoiners be like 😂 (9418 points, 413 comments)
    2. When you HODL through a bear market (1939 points, 108 comments)
  69. 11339 points, 1 submission: CosmosKing98
    1. This is governments trying to regulate bitcoin. (11339 points, 549 comments)
  70. 11198 points, 1 submission: Ryamgram
    1. <---- Number of Hodlers with Strong Hands (11198 points, 1127 comments)
  71. 11079 points, 2 submissions: ForeverDutch92
    1. Dutch national newspaper urges people to sell all their Bitcoins as it undermines the government, could destabilise the economy and reduces the power of central banks. Sounds like a reason to buy to me 🤔 (9843 points, 986 comments)
    2. We really need to start pushing for SegWit support. Stop waiting for the Lightning Network to fix everything. (1236 points, 318 comments)
  72. 11063 points, 5 submissions: amorpisseur
    1. South Korean gov't "shocked" at the number of citizens requesting the removal of Justice Minister and Finance Minister for market manipulation (4015 points, 236 comments)
    2. BREAKING: TD Ameritrade to allow bitcoin futures trading Monday (2571 points, 234 comments)
    3. "Microsoft and Starbucks signed on to use the new platform for payments and accept BTC" (2190 points, 330 comments)
    4. We found who's spamming the mempool (1162 points, 207 comments)
    5. Lightning Network progress: 72 out of 75 tests pass! (1125 points, 562 comments)
  73. 11010 points, 1 submission: Sam767679
    1. Legendary story by John McAfee (11010 points, 472 comments)
  74. 10959 points, 1 submission: InteractiveLedger
    1. This is NOT OK. Upvote for visibility (10959 points, 1505 comments)
  75. 10750 points, 1 submission: singularityissonear
    1. Time to invest! (10750 points, 329 comments)
  76. 10749 points, 1 submission: broscientologist
    1. I made a decision tree for everyone panic selling. (10749 points, 896 comments)
  77. 10688 points, 1 submission: K_owar_D
    1. They never told me that buying the lambo would be the easy part... (10688 points, 495 comments)
  78. 10626 points, 1 submission: bigbenxx
    1. Checking the Bitcoin price at work: (10626 points, 328 comments)
  79. 10419 points, 1 submission: EMC2_trooper
    1. I see it every day. (10419 points, 289 comments)
  80. 10330 points, 1 submission: LAH92
    1. The latecomer’s BTC journey (10330 points, 271 comments)
  81. 10324 points, 1 submission: old-man-blorp
    1. It would be so easy then (10324 points, 222 comments)
  82. 10187 points, 1 submission: mrtambourineman89
    1. BTC Grandpa already doubled his profit. (10187 points, 597 comments)
  83. 10027 points, 2 submissions: David3692
    1. Looking at the price when you invested only what you can afford to lose (7560 points, 744 comments)
    2. Trying to explain to the wife why we should buy more now (2467 points, 260 comments)

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  47. lucky_rabbit_foot (3035 points, 41 comments)
  48. FDisk80 (3027 points, 10 comments)
  49. TheGreatMuffin (3009 points, 189 comments)
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  51. LegendsRoom (2992 points, 58 comments)
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  55. suninabox (2929 points, 466 comments)
  56. BlatantConservative (2896 points, 28 comments)
  57. tyrael98 (2891 points, 2 comments)
  58. mbrochh (2890 points, 100 comments)
  59. hungry4donutz (2866 points, 3 comments)
  60. WhoNeedsFacts (2809 points, 2 comments)
  61. greatbawlsofire (2792 points, 2 comments)
  62. pg3crypto (2791 points, 67 comments)
  63. Anon7216 (2791 points, 13 comments)
  64. togetherwem0m0 (2789 points, 64 comments)
  65. StrictlyOffTheRecord (2787 points, 4 comments)
  66. jonivaio (2777 points, 3 comments)
  67. BTCChampion (2752 points, 11 comments)
  68. yung_yas (2752 points, 3 comments)
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  72. strange_fate (2671 points, 36 comments)
  73. Downvotesohoy (2664 points, 6 comments)
  74. daghanerdonmez (2646 points, 5 comments)
  75. Saschb2b (2633 points, 1 comment)
  76. ebaley (2627 points, 1008 comments)
  77. catVdog123 (2619 points, 67 comments)
  78. ducksauce88 (2593 points, 280 comments)
  79. leroyyrogers (2593 points, 39 comments)
  80. PM_UR_UGLY_SWEATERS (2582 points, 9 comments)
  81. Cryptolution (2575 points, 310 comments)
  82. CryptoBobs (2530 points, 3 comments)
  83. Beckneard (2527 points, 39 comments)
  84. gbitg (2515 points, 85 comments)
  85. Kooriki (2511 points, 220 comments)
  86. ILikeToSayHi (2475 points, 24 comments)
  87. SPOKANARCHY (2472 points, 1 comment)
  88. letterboxmind (2469 points, 102 comments)
  89. lawmaster99 (2447 points, 30 comments)
  90. Reverend_James (2445 points, 74 comments)
  91. time_wasted504 (2439 points, 88 comments)
  92. TheBoyChris (2432 points, 4 comments)
  93. Frogolocalypse (2409 points, 518 comments)
  94. lriccardo (2388 points, 119 comments)
  95. __Vet__ (2372 points, 53 comments)
  96. ep1939 (2358 points, 133 comments)
  97. BBA935 (2339 points, 22 comments)
  98. Marcion_Sinope (2333 points, 210 comments)
  99. beamybeams (2323 points, 12 comments)
  100. Sawyeee (2309 points, 2 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. It's official! 1 Bitcoin = $10,000 USD by LeeWallis (48506 points, 4587 comments)
  2. The last 3 months in 47 seconds. by Tricky_Troll (48474 points, 790 comments)
  3. It's over 9000!!! by wolfwolfz (42429 points, 3170 comments)
  4. Everyone who's trading BTC right now by buttockpain (42048 points, 804 comments)
  5. I hope James is doing well by KINNAHZ (29323 points, 1242 comments)
  6. Weeeeeeee! by trance929 (29123 points, 1530 comments)
  7. Bitcoin.. The King by Xtreme110 (28328 points, 1178 comments)
  8. Nothing can increase by that much and still be a good investment. by benjaminikuta (28063 points, 1318 comments)
  9. This is why I want bitcoin to hit $10,000 by Kittstar123 (26949 points, 918 comments)
  10. Bitcoin Doesn't Give a Fuck. by Tricky_Troll (26322 points, 1505 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 11914 points: viper2097's comment in I hope James is doing well
  2. 9195 points: deleted's comment in possibly the worst thing about this crash...
  3. 6799 points: TarAldarion's comment in It's official! 1 Bitcoin = $10,000 USD
  4. 6589 points: deleted's comment in Nothing can increase by that much and still be a good investment.
  5. 6158 points: deleted's comment in My brother killed himself because of BTC
  6. 5537 points: Annu_Naki's comment in What he would be wishing now? 😂
  7. 5501 points: nightspy1309's comment in BTC dropping due to lack of quality 11k memes. Closest support line is at 9k Vegeta memes.
  8. 5410 points: stevoli's comment in Insider tip: BTC is going to skyrocket in the next 48 hours
  9. 5353 points: gkikoria's comment in Weeeeeeee!
  10. 5325 points: cxr303's comment in Guys, I am out
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Bitstamp's streaming API, and exploitation possibilities it might reveal

TL;DR: Bitstamp's undocumented streaming API seems to reveal out-of-order trade execution that can be exploited to steal margins from large buys/sells.
Bitstamp has an undocumented streaming API. You should know what it seems to reveal about Bitstamp's order matching.
It's not surprising that I see trades on the stream about 10s before I see them on BitcoinWisdom etc. (I haven't compared that to the latency of direct API polling; my lag to BW and processing lag at BW's end might be included there.) That's already not fair. Bitstamp should document the stream, or delay it.
Before I tell you what is surprising, a quick detour: Bitstamp only provides limit orders. "Instant" (aka Market) orders are simulated by placing a limit order with the limit set to whatever was the top of the opposite side of the book at the time, and as anyone who has tried to trade at Bitstamp during a rally/drop will know, the top often moves before your "instant" order hits the books and therefore doesn't execute. People work around this by manually or automatically placing limit orders with limits that go beyond the top of the opposite side of the book, ensuring that they'll match something.
Suppose someone places such a limit order. Rather than lock the book until the order is matched and produces a trade, the order is placed on the book and the book is allowed to cross. People have reported here on Reddit seeing this before. That's kind of surprising, but perhaps you're thinking they ensure things still execute in order. Well, the stream I'm watching includes both order and trade events, and I typically see orders on the stream anywhere between ~2.5s and ~8s ("the window") before they match and produce a trade; if you're only trading by watching BitcoinWisdom and others, I see things happen as much as 18s ahead of you.
What properly surprises me is that within the window, if another limit order gets placed with a limit even higher than the first before the first has matched, that second order can execute before the first. An example from real stream data follows. The best ask (order_type=1) is 202.10, set by the first order creation I've included. received is added by me on receipt; the rest comes from the live stream. Some non-participating orders away from the book top have been removed for clarity.
{"received": "1383077092.151", "type": "order_created", "price": "202.10", "amount": "3.00700000", "datetime": "1383077091", "id": 8595046, "order_type": 1} {"received": "1383077095.876", "type": "order_created", "price": "221.13", "amount": "0.19825903", "datetime": "1383077095", "id": 8595048, "order_type": 0} {"received": "1383077098.420", "type": "order_created", "price": "222.65", "amount": "0.63000000", "datetime": "1383077098", "id": 8595051, "order_type": 0} {"received": "1383077100.908", "type": "order_deleted", "price": "222.65", "amount": "0.00000000", "datetime": "1383077099", "id": 8595051, "order_type": 0} {"received": "1383077100.918", "type": "order_changed", "price": "202.10", "amount": "2.37700000", "datetime": "1383077096", "id": 8595046, "order_type": 1} {"received": "1383077100.964", "type": "trade", "price": 202.09999999999999, "amount": 0.63, "id": 1698465} {"received": "1383077101.016", "type": "order_deleted", "price": "221.13", "amount": "0.00000000", "datetime": "1383077099", "id": 8595048, "order_type": 0} {"received": "1383077101.051", "type": "order_changed", "price": "202.10", "amount": "2.17874097", "datetime": "1383077096", "id": 8595046, "order_type": 1} {"received": "1383077101.063", "type": "trade", "price": 202.09999999999999, "amount": 0.19825903, "id": 1698466} 
Bid 8595048 for 0.19825903 @ 221.13 would cross the book, and should match immediately, but orders continue to be accepted and no trade appears.
Bid 8595051 for 0.63 @ 222.65 would also cross the book, but since it arrived ~2.544 seconds later — and assuming FIFO matching — it shouldn't execute until after 8595048. But it executes first. In this case, fortunately there's enough depth to the ask that both fill at the price they should, but this out-of-order execution occurs even when there isn't enough depth; I can give real examples from the stream but they make less clear examples because they tend to involve multiple fills.
Imagine that you're watching this stream and you see the FBI dump the SR coins, and that the window is wide enough for you to react. You could place a limit order that beats theirs, being sure to sell your coins before theirs crash the exchange rate.
Alternatively you could always maintain a buy order in the book, far enough away that you can maintain a constant distance from the best bid but close enough that a whale might fill it. When you see a whale's sell, you snipe a high sell by beating their limit. The whale's order then goes through and fills some other bids, and your low buy. You effectively just made a high sale and made a low buy with no risk at all. You could do this on both sides of the book at once.
Why document this instead of just taking advantage of it? I hate the idea that some traders are playing with loaded dice. If the engine has to behave in this funky way, it should be documented; ideally it should simply behave as everyone expects it to anyway. Why post under a throwaway? While I've made no attempt to exploit this, I wouldn't put it past Bitstamp to confiscate my balances and close my account; that's simpler for them than checking whether I did exploit it. (In case I choose to link this to my real account later or you need me to prove I'm me, I can provide a pre-image for e591ed9a365ad73d29dc22f10b170fff and d4bd7f9db698c81ba31ce544d2025834.) Why not report it to Bitstamp first? Bitstamp has a poor track record for addressing bugs reported in their engine, probably needs to be embarrassed into doing something, and they can easily just disable the stream. I've left stream access details undocumented, for now. EDIT: described on bitcointalk (via Pusher) as well as below (direct WebSocket access).
I'd ask Bitstamp to confirm whether they believe this is a problem, say what they plan to do about it (if anything) and I invite them to PM me here in the unlikely event that they need more info.
I'd also really like them to make their stream useable, along with a single orderbook snapshot, to maintain an accurate of the orderbook without having to make unreliable inferences — i.e. include prev_amount (or amount_delta) in order_deleted and order_changed, and also include in each trade event the order IDs that matched. Having these things would bring it towards or beyond MtGox's stream, which provides at least the remaining volume at the affected pricepoint. It'd also be lovely if the ungrouped orderbook snapshot included order IDs and could be explicitly pinned between two stream order_foo events for easier syncing (the timestamp doesn't seem to accurately match the stream's datetimes, and requires guesswork). And a pony and a winnebago and the moon on a stick.
submitted by serves-two to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Mtgox: Calm Down Dear

TLDR: Gox never was that great, don't just swallow all the freaking-out.

UPDATE in my understanding:

1) 10% of coins on gox are 'off the books'. Have they gone? There are interesting changes to the orderbooks too. Very low price orders (<$100) are being moved/withdrawn.
2) The withdrawl problems I understand to be that they tried to send a whole bunch of bitcoin payments in chunks, but didn't put enough transaction fee for the size, so miners didn't pick them up. Mtgox has to wait for them to ..(come back?) before re-sending them. Like posting a cheque to somebody, but not putting a stamp on the envelope.
Isolvency: very unlikely Criminal: unlikely (and unwise) USD withdrawl problems: Old news (USD is an old market) JPY: all good (I assume) usecehmu Slow BTC withdrawls: bad if true, probably not true Zillions of support tickets: Not great, but old news, and they have Zillions of customers.
High prices because people are exiting gox: Dumbass perma-myth (in my opinion)
Gox is hard-core. I love it.
BTC-e was being touted as a 'market leader' but, yet again FREAKED out at the last mini-drop. Gox knew better and blitzed up the numbers: "that ain't a knife"
This blah uses basic meachisms to blow away some things that might be counter-intuative at first glance. It is not supposed to be ultra clever.
Mechanisms:
No USD withdrawls: Gox is not a currency exchnage, but sells BTC to any currency at a 'single' price. Example: Americans are 'generally' withdrawing money, Chinese are pumping money in. Gox has loads of YEN, no dollars, but BTC prices are rising and rising. Therefor, you can't withdraw dollars, because Gox ain't got none, despite your coins being worth a high dollar value.
USD Withdrawl issues might not be the "big deal" people seem to think it is:
1) USD does not mean Americans. Many people trade dollars because many people trade dollars. This means that USD withdraws are... not as big a problem as you might expect. If you're expecting gox to disappear becuase Americans can't get their money... it might not happen. I understand that European withdrawls are reliably slow (~month) and Japanese withdraws are in the days range. 2) Why would you withdrawn fiat. Only a few Pro Traders would do that, but then, the returns on BTC are so mental, they'd probably just keep growing BTC anyway.
Insolvency: Just like ebay allows you to buy and sell stuff, 'Gox allows you to buy and sell bitcoins. They don't personally send their money. In the event of a run-on-the-gox, simply the price will either drop/go through the roof depending if fiat/BTC is coming out. No sweat of 'goxs back. It's just matching buyers with sellers.
Gox is probably absolutely loaded. For every of 1,000 BTC exchanged, they're currently getting about $5000. For what? running a website? Isn't that when the computers do everything? Pr-ofit.
Asside from that it's just business as usual. Slow BTC withdrawls aren't great. If 'coins stop coming out of gox, that's bad, but they shouldn't. These are not 'goxes coins. Every coin in should be withdraw-able, unless criminal stuff has gone on.
High-gox-price-is-people-existing-myth: This has been the 'accepted reason' for high gox prices since june - i.e - forever.
Just quickly:
  1. If people really were exiting gox in a hurry, then yes, the price would rise, but also, They Would Have Gone. Gox-price has been consistantly high for ages. China trumped it because it was crazy for coins.
  2. I am convinced that the other exchanges have a different risk-profile. Also BTC-E is an exit-point for other cryptos = lower lows.
  3. It might be that Gox has the oldest (and most powerful?) robots on. I understand the API to be better. Bots NEED APIs. They might drive the price. Moving bots is a real freaking hassle. Try telling it to adjust it's old data for price differences? huge loss.
  4. If fees are higher, that will probably also drive prices up faster (in order to make the same profit on a trade, it needs to rise more)
  5. If you were a serious trader, looking to exit gox, you'd do it in a clever place. There have been plenty of perfect opportunities to exit over the last 3 months. Pro traders would a)not be so scaredy cat b) probably not leave unless they needed to. c) probably dont need to
  6. Becuase of the high prices and volatility, gox is a great place to trade and make money, so it's not without it's charms.
  7. It might be that it's closer to the asian market, which might be different from 'stamp and '-E.
  8. At the moment I think it's hyper-high becuase Gox is usually the "first one up", and it thinks we're off on some new bubble. I'm not sure I believe it, but that's a different thread.
  9. Slow withdrawls might be enough to fight arb, and therefor insulate high prices. This is different from people exiting gox.
  10. Coins have exited gox, but only around half. They other exchanges may have risen around them. In terms of $dollar value, it's dealing with 5x more than 4 months ago ish (with half the coins, but 10x price rise).
I don't know the exact-stuffs, but I just wanted to post these points so people at least had seen them. I'm hoping this isn't downvoted to death, but am fatalistically indifferent if it does.
submitted by inteblio to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

FYI: The all-time record BTCUSD high of June 2011 (31.9099) hasn't been broken yet (today's high is 31.699)

On Wedesday, 08 Jun 2011 17:10:38 GMT, 0.53 bitcoins were purchased for the price of 31.9099 USD/BTC.
This was followed, 4 seconds after (Wednesday, 08 Jun 2011 17:10:42 GMT), by two trades of, first, 1.094 BTC, then 0.003 BTC at the same price.
So the current high (as of this writing) of 31.699, which occurred at the following times (in GMT), is 0.2109 USD away from breaking the record.
2013-02-26 14:36:53 price:31.699000000000 vol:0.606562650000 2013-02-26 14:36:52 price:31.699000000000 vol:0.606562650000 2013-02-26 14:36:37 price:31.699000000000 vol:0.606562650000 2013-02-26 14:36:30 price:31.699000000000 vol:0.322758380000 2013-02-26 14:33:47 price:31.699000000000 vol:156.516048140000 
Source: Mt. Gox historical data from http://bitcoincharts.com/about/markets-api/
Parsed with this ugly Python script:
#!/usbin/python import urllib2, datetime, time all_time_high_url="http://bitcoincharts.com/t/trades.csv?symbol=mtgoxUSD&start=1307534400&end=1307707200" recent_high_url="http://bitcoincharts.com/t/trades.csv?symbol=mtgoxUSD" def print_high(URL): data = urllib2.urlopen(URL).read() newvar = data.split('\n') high = 0 high_trades = [] for trade in newvar: if float(trade.split(',')[1]) > high: high_trades.append(trade) high = float(trade.split(',')[1]) elif float(trade.split(',')[1]) == high: high_trades.append(trade) trade_val = float(high_trades[-1].split(',')[1]) for trade in high_trades[::-1]: array = trade.split(',') if (float(array[1]) == trade_val): #print "%s price:%s vol:%s" % (datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(time.gmtime(int(array[0]))).strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'), array[1], array[2]) print "%s price:%s vol:%s" % (time.strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S', time.gmtime(int(array[0]))), array[1], array[2]) else: break trade_val = float(array[1]) print "All time high:" print_high(all_time_high_url) print "Recent high:" print_high(recent_high_url) 
submitted by runeks to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Current state of affairs

IMPORTANTE NOTE: THIS THREAD IS NO LONGER BEING UPDATED, PLEASE FOLLOW THIS ONE INSTEAD: http://www.reddit.com/mtgoxinsolvency/comments/21hrv8/current_state_of_affairs/ I explain the reason for the change here. Thanks!

LAST UPDATE: March 27th 2014 09:47 GMT +1

NOTE: I'm trying my best but because of the sheer volume of tidbits popping up every day, this post might ocasionally miss some updates. Please feel free to point it out in the comments whenever you feel there is information missing in the post, thanks!
A note on recovering funds: We have no information on how to recover fiat/bitcoins/goxcoins yet and MtGox has only given very vague statements so far. It is speculated Mark Karpeles (CEO of MtGox) is currently figuring out what to do and not flying to the Bahamas with our money. It is advisable to have patience and wait for new developments on the subject for the time being.
March 26th, 2014
Match 25th, 2014
A new rumor has surfaced twitter, currently unsubstantiated, from @CanarslanEren who according to his previous tweets would have previously either guessed correctly or know in advance about the recovered 200K BTC (emphasis mine):
Within a few days(or hours) @MtGox will announce that "they found ~670.000 #bitcoin & may release some BTCs to the victims. @PatronaPartners
https://twitter.com/CanarslanEren/status/448418452701974528
The community consensus at the moment seems to be of skepticism, as it always goes with this kind of rumors. See also:
March 21th, 2014
  • There's a new update on mtgox.com confirming the previous story of having recovered 200K BTC that were thought lost. Key points:
    • On March 7, 2014, MtGox Co., Ltd. confirmed that an oldn format wallet which was used prior to June 2011 held a balance of approximately 200,000 BTC (199,999.99 BTC)
    • For security reasons, the 200,000 BTC which were at first on the 7th moved to online wallets were moved between the 14 th and the 15th to offline wallets.
    • The bitcoins held today by MtGox Co., Ltd. amount to a total of approximately 202,000 BTC, including the above 200,000 BTC and the approximately 2,000 BTC which existed prior to the application for commencement of a civil rehabilitation proceeding.
March 20th, 2014
  • Several users were reporting issues with the balance-checking tool online at mtgox.com, namely that bank transfers and transactions stuck in progress were not showing. This is now apparently fixed and balances seem to have been accordingly updated. Thread here.
  • In line with the blockchain movements we've seen for the past few weeks and the respective MtGox API activity, finally a japanese news article appeared where MtGox lawyers announce MtGox has found and owns 200K BTC, translation, courtesy of h1d:
    Bitcoin exchange Mt.Gox which collapsed in February announced on 20th that they have found they're still in possession of the 200,000 BTC out of the 850,000 BTC that was reported to be lost.
    According to the lawyer, they found them on the 7th of this month by searching through a storage on the internet called a "wallet" which was being used by MtGox up until June 2011.
    MtGox has reported that they have lost almost all of the 850,000 BTC owned while filing for bankruptcy protection on February 28th.
    /bitcoin thread here.
March 18th, 2014
  • A new update on mtgox.com is now online: account holders can now provide their login authentication data on the site to retrieve the last status of their wallets for convenience. It would appear that this update is legimitate, Redditcoin states:
    I just called the MtGox call centre in Japan - they confirmed that the login has been put there by "legal" and they have not been hacked. I called this number from the original banckrupty announcement (I called from Australia - we are only 2 hours ahead): +81 3-4588-3922. A nice man with an American accent said that the login has been put there by "legal" for users to check their balances and that the website has not been hacked.
    Redditcoin asked for transaction history data as well:
    I called the number again (about an hour later) - again, absolutely no waiting - I called again to ask about my transaction history. The same man answered, with the American accent (although sounded Japanese), who spoke impeccable English. He said that the transaction history is still unavailable because the courts still have to "polish" it (whatever that means). I said I needed it for taxation purposes. He replied by saying he will "check on this, and post an update on the website soon".
    As for the balance data that can now be retrieved on mtgox.com, the site notes (emphasis mine):
    This balance confirmation service is provided on this site only for the convenience of all users. Please be aware that confirming the balance on this site does not constitute a filing of rehabilitation claims under the civil rehabilitation procedure and note that the balance amounts shown on this site should also not be considered an acknowledgment by MtGox Co., Ltd. of the amount of any rehabilitation claims of users. Rehabilitation claims under a civil rehabilitation procedure become confirmed from a filing which is followed by an investigation procedure. The method for filing claims will be published on this site as soon as we will be in situation to announce it.
  • The MtGox API which used to list pending transactions has been removed today. In the past few weeks, this API had shown that the hundreds of thousands of BTC moving in the blockchain connected with MtGox wallets could still belong to Gox. Thread.
Match 17th, 2014
March 16, 2014
An new unconfirmed, unverified IRC quote appeared on /bitcoin:
we are working on resuming service, can't say how soon it'll be
While the authenticity is still in question, if true this would be in line with all the rumors and hints we've seen up until now.
March 15, 2014
  • The hundreds of thousands of coins moving in the blockchain that MtGox allegedly still own have been spotted doing something new: the outputs are now merging in new addresses of 2K BTC each. This was first spotted in this thread and later confirmed here. As usual, we have zero indications of what this means yet. -Mahn speculates:
    The only thing I can imagine myself is that whoever is doing the splitting decided 50 BTC was too little or would take too long and switched to bigger outputs per address.
  • New movement in the MtGox order book as reported by their still online API has been detected. Thread.
  • Further discussion on bitcointalk revealed that the alleged personal customer information for sale by the recent MtGox data leak hackers is most likely fake. See also this thread.
March 14th, 2014
There's a new update on mtgox.com concerning their Chapter 15 US filing. It contains no new information other than the confirmation of the news that appeared on March 11th.
March 12th, 2014
  • MtGox US subsidiary assets have been temporarily frozen by US Judge. Story here.
  • Mark Karpeles declaration to the US Bankruptcy Court has been published online:
    "On February 7, 2014, all bitcoin withdrawals were halted by MtGox due to the theft or disappearance of hundreds of thousands of bitcoins owned by MtGox customers as well as MtGox itself. The cause of the theft or disappearance is the subject of intensive investigation by me and others -- as of the present time I believe it was caused or related to a defect or "bug" in the bitcoin software algorithm, which was exploited by one or more persons who had "hacked" the bitcoin network. On February 24, 2014, MtGox suspended all trading after internal investigations discovered a loss of 744,408 bitcoins presumably from this method of theft. These events caused among others MtGox to become insolvent and to file the Japan Proceeding."
    Discussion thread.
March 1st-11th:
http://www.reddit.com/mtgoxinsolvency/comments/1yvvec/current_state_of_affairs/cg2di1f
February 2014:
http://www.reddit.com/mtgoxinsolvency/comments/1yvvec/current_state_of_affairs/cfywewf
submitted by -Mahn to mtgoxinsolvency [link] [comments]

Another way to look at the bubbles

This is a follow up to a post I made a couple of days ago looking at the log-linear regression of bitcoin prices:
http://www.reddit.com/BitcoinMarkets/comments/21smpsome_perspective_on_the_current_pessimism/
This post is going to look at this regression again, but this time using it to make comparisons between Bitcoin's bubbles.
One way to compare Bitcoin's bubble periods is by categorizing periods on the basis of how far away they are from the regression line. The set of these distance measures is known as the 'residuals'. What I've done in this chart is colour code each price depending on where on a set of ranges its residual value falls.
http://i.imgur.com/y1Klgum.png
How did I select the ranges I did? Semi-arbitrarily (if anyone knows of a less-arbitrary way to do this let me know). The residuals seem to cluster to some degree around certain ranges when you look at them in a histogram. So that's why I chose the ranges that I did.
http://i.imgur.com/FbqtIfV.png
What I think a chart like this is representing is how far away bitcoin is from its exponential growth trend. So a bubble is interpreted relative to that growth trend and not its absolute growth in value. This gives different results from when you just look at absolute price growth.
For example - if you compare the 2012/13 bubble with the 2013/14 bubble on the basis of the absolute amount of price growth then the former of these is the larger bubble with about 13x price growth compared to about 8x. But from the perspective of the price relative to the exponential growth trend, the latter is clearly larger. How is this possible, you can see it easily from the chart. The 2012/13 bubble came off a much larger slump relative to the trend (a blue zone) - whereas the 2013/14 bubble had less ground to make up. It started in a green zone. Furthermore, while the 2012/13 bubble makes it into the orange zone - it only stays there briefly. It's really mostly a yellow level event. The 2013/14 bubble is is definitively an orange level event and even gets into the red zone for a day.
The 2011 bubble is less interesting from this perspective since it is big in all respects - both price growth and its residuals. Notice also how some quite large price increases (3x in jun-aug 2012) don't even count as bubbles on this analysis even though they have the same triangle shape as the others.
In terms of the current downtrend it provides an extra rationalisation as to why things aren't that grim. We are currently in a green period - which is the most common colour by far. Green is not a bad place to be if you care about whether or not Bitcoin is maintaining its long term trend. Blue is where things start to get concerning. If that chart ever registers a significant period of purple - that's when I'm going to start to freak out for bitcoin's long term future.
As always - take this stuff with large pinches of salt. If you look at this stuff yourself, I recommend trying to come up with alternative (principled) ways of choosing your colour regions. You can also experiment with using different time frames. If you start your regression at the beginning of the 2012/13 bubble then it becomes much larger than the 2013/14 bubble. I personally don't think this is appropriate if you are looking at the long term exponential growth - but you gotta bear it in mind.
One other thing - this data swaps from the mtgox to bitstamp data. I feel mtgox data is generally to be avoided, because of the way it skewed the market - but it's all we have from the early periods.
Here is the code for those who want to play. About to hit the town for some booze n ladies... so won't respond to comments questions (if any) until tomorrow. :)
import json, requests import pandas as pd import numpy as np import datetime as dt import operator import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib.dates as mdates def get_data(api_name): ''' pulls data from the quandl api api_name either 'BITSTAMPUSD' or 'MTGOXUSD' ''' url = 'http://www.quandl.com/api/v1/datasets/BITCOIN/{0}.json'.format(api_name) r = requests.get(url) raw_data = r.json() # put the data in a Pandas DataFrame object data = pd.DataFrame(raw_data['data'], columns=raw_data['column_names']) # change the order so the earliest records are first data = data.reindex(index=data.index[::-1]) # reset the index order increasing from 0 data['i'] = range(0,len(data)) data = data.set_index('i') return data bitstamp_data = get_data('BITSTAMPUSD') mtgox_data = get_data('MTGOXUSD') #change the dates to python datetime objects bitstamp_data['Date'] = pd.to_datetime(bitstamp_data['Date']) mtgox_data['Date'] = pd.to_datetime(mtgox_data['Date']) # select the mt gox data prior to bitstamp pre_bitstamp = mtgox_data[(mtgox_data['Date'] < bitstamp_data['Date'][0])] # whack the mtgox and bitstamp data together data = pre_bitstamp.append(bitstamp_data) data['i'] = range(0,len(data)) data = data.set_index('i') # Data has some bad values. Replace them with previous days data # First replace the bad values with a NaN value data.loc[(data['Open']==1.7e+308), 'Open':] = np.nan # now replace the NaN values with the previous days values data = data.fillna(method='pad') # create X and Y for the regression X = pd.DataFrame(index=data.index) X['0'] = 1 X['1'] = data.index # convert the price data to a log10 scale Y = pd.DataFrame(index=data.index) Y['0'] = np.log10(data.loc[:, 'Weighted Price']) # convert to numpy matrices for use in the normal equation X = X.as_matrix() Y = Y.as_matrix() # Normal equation (works much better than gradient descent in this case) X_T = X.transpose() theta = np.linalg.inv(X_T.dot(X)).dot(X_T).dot(Y) # use theta to plot the regression regress = X.dot(theta) # create a histogram of the residuals (difference between actual and predicted values) diff = Y - regress bins = np.linspace(diff.min()-0.2, diff.max()+0.2 , 80) plt.hist(diff, bins) plt.show() # select groups of residuals for colouring # ranges are selected on the (semi-arbitrary) basis of how they appear to be grouped in the # histogram above. purple = ((diff > -1.0) & (diff < -0.65)).flatten() blue = ((diff > -0.65) & (diff < -0.31)).flatten() green = ((diff > -0.31) & (diff < 0.0)).flatten() yellow = ((diff > 0.0) & (diff < 0.27)).flatten() orange = ((diff > 0.27) & (diff < 0.6)).flatten() red = ((diff > 0.6) & (diff < 1)).flatten() pink = (diff > 1.0).flatten() # Create the chart # Let matplotlib do the work of selecting date ticks plt.gca().xaxis.set_major_formatter(mdates.DateFormatter('%Y-%m-%d')) plt.gca().xaxis.set_major_locator(mdates.AutoDateLocator()) # plotting the raw price data and then log scaling the chart plt.plot(data['Date'], data['Weighted Price']) # regression data is already in log scale, so scale it back up. plt.plot(data['Date'], 10 ** regress) # apply the log scale to the chart plt.axes().set_yscale('log') plt.xlabel('Date') plt.ylabel('Price (USD)') plt.grid() # Plot the residuals plt.scatter(data['Date'][purple], data['Weighted Price'][purple], marker='x', c='#2E0854', label="-1.0 < res < -0.65") plt.scatter(data['Date'][blue], data['Weighted Price'][blue], marker='x', c='b', label="-0.65 < res < -0.31") plt.scatter(data['Date'][green], data['Weighted Price'][green], marker='x', c='g', label="-0.31 < res < 0.0") plt.scatter(data['Date'][yellow], data['Weighted Price'][yellow], marker='x', c='y', label="0.0 < res < 0.27") plt.scatter(data['Date'][orange], data['Weighted Price'][orange], marker='x', c='#FF6600', label="0.27 < res < 0.6") plt.scatter(data['Date'][red], data['Weighted Price'][red], marker='x', c='r', label="0.6 < res < 1.0") plt.scatter(data['Date'][pink], data['Weighted Price'][pink], marker='x', c='#ff69b4', label="1.0 < res") # add the legend handles, labels = plt.axes().get_legend_handles_labels() plt.legend(handles, labels, loc=2) plt.show() 
submitted by grovulent to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

It was Willy the Bot all the time

After long digging I finally found a workable scenario explaining virtually everything: missing coins and fiat and even so called Willy the Bot.
lnovy> Yes... stay tuned... I have a clue :) gammer> lnovy any news ? lnovy> yes... almost... I'm missing just one single piece now gammer> if you're pulling a prank on us these couple of days... it so not cool :D lnovy> They way the theft worked was usign the paybutton api lnovy> there is an obvious cross-site request forgery bug in it lnovy> attacker create a one-shot button, setting a price in USD and putting in a bitcoin address lnovy> then he made a victim with mtgox account "click" this pay button lnovy> which caused market buy order for that amount to be filled (known as satoshi's thrust, or willy the bot) and after filling coins were instantly send to target address gammer> lnovy: you know this for a fact? lnovy> when you combine this with some other scamming/carding technique and faked AML documents, mtgox would lose bitcoins and fiat deposit would be charged back lnovy> I'm sure of it up to the second part (when you combine...) lnovy> I can prove it lnovy> well... not prove it... but I have no other possible explanation gammer> how you get the victim to click your "custom" button? lnovy> check the source of this page http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:bnsz3it6l9YJ:https://payment.mtgox.com/21b2e5c5-79d5-4192-bd6e-9e08975cc3ac+&cd=59&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=cz&client=firefox-a lnovy> no protection against csrf gammer> We lack data. These are all great (impressive) guesses, but far from a smoking barrel. lnovy> notice that when you google 21b2e5c5-79d5-4192-bd6e-9e08975cc3ac lnovy> You already paid that transaction in the past! We have a transaction from your account on the 2013-08-08 13:20:12 lnovy> When you lookup "2013-08-08 13:20:12" in withdrawals db lnovy> ae04aae7-d6dc-4f34-a2df-0930480786e6,e887c417-1fbe-4988-a76d-515b6a528e8b,"2013-08-08 13:20:12",withdraw,-26.92114483 lnovy> this user did two withdrawals only, no deposits lnovy> ae04aae7-d6dc-4f34-a2df-0930480786e6,ce7a32a0-1be7-4c0c-b06c-75aa77f5c311,"2013-08-08 13:05:45",withdraw,-27.18101624 lnovy> this is the second one lnovy> his balance is lnovy> | ae04aae7-d6dc-4f34-a2df-0930480786e6 | 83d24ca9-0f6e-4061-ad75-f4698c9ad58a | BTC | 56783893 | 0 | 7 | virtual | NULL | NULL | N | 2013-08-08 13:20:12 | gammer> hmm, maybe there is some smoke there. lnovy> | 673c4e76-a8e1-424a-af72-f994054236f4 | 83d24ca9-0f6e-4061-ad75-f4698c9ad58a | USD | 7952770 | 0 | 4 | virtual | NULL | NULL | N | 2013-08-08 13:04:28 | lnovy> notice that no more moving of BTC was done after withdrawal at 2013-08-08 13:20:12 lnovy> ../trades/2013-08_coinlab.csv:1375967016444075,"2013-08-08 13:03:36",592438,83d24ca9-0f6e-4061-ad75-f4698c9ad58a,ec0919d81d73ab12dc7375677723fea9,NJP,buy,USD,54,5507.94438,97.114,534897.778,0,97.114,0,0.1296,1330.073,US,NJ lnovy> ../trades/2013-08_coinlab.csv:1375967068401809,"2013-08-08 13:04:28",592438,83d24ca9-0f6e-4061-ad75-f4698c9ad58a,ec0919d81d73ab12dc7375677723fea9,NJP,buy,USD,1,101.97792,97.114,9903.47,0,97.114,0,0.0024,24.631,US,NJ lnovy> he did only this two trades... lnovy> notice that all of his limit value on wallets is null, but dissable limit is false lnovy> last piece: https://blockchain.info/address/1La4eXNXYLF41cnkADh2pKi8LGN7ePSFde lnovy> this address leads to mixnet :) lnovy> so... is the barrel smoking now? gammer> Looks convincing gammer> Any way to tell how much flowed through that exploit? lnovy> well... my query is still running... But I bet, that everything that was considered to be "will the bot" will be linked to this method lnovy> can I leave your nicknames in when I paste this on reddit? 
submitted by lnovy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I wrote a chrome extension that alarms you when the price changes in your range (cross-post /r/bitcoin)

For upping my javascript knowledge I wrote a simple chrome script. It checks the prices with the mtgox json api and pulls the average price your selected currency.
This is also an effort to get back into bitcoin. Two years ago I was trying out bitcoin, but didn't think much of it. Last week Bitcoin was discussed by my peers and then I realised I just lost 50 bitcoins on my old wallet. These things happen though, so now I'm trying to get back into the game. This time for real.
Oh, I didn't realize there would be a wall of text, i'll drop the link now:
https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/bitcoin-alarm/ppgjikdonniljdcjpplbcnkhbdjikdgn
If you are interested in the source, you can download the .crx and open it as a zip. Source crx link
Suggestions are very welcome! Although I prefer that you post them in the comments section instead of PMing me, so that others can see what's already suggested.
Peace
PS: I accept bitcointips ^ . ^ (for repaying my google license)
submitted by bealhorm to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Things you should look for in a cryptocurrency exchange

“Let’s say you want to buy 1 Bitcoin, sign up on an exchange and wait for 3 days. A few days later you receive an e-mail saying ‘Our servers compromised… all funds stolen. We are sorry’. Now where to go? ,"
Recent volatility in cryptocurrency space has created a new customer base looking for profit and quick money, these customers are new investors or rookies can take part due to the open nature of cryptocurrency. It is important to choose with which exchange you are buying and selling cryptocurrency.
Many major exchanges have faced various potential threats in the past such as hacking, regulatory issues, bad business practices due to messy combination of poor management, neglect, and raw inexperience.
Attacks
Number of exchanges attacked and many million of dollars stolen, MtGox was the first one where a group of hackers compromised the servers due to the central nature of the service provider. It is easy to gain access and take control of private keys which controls your bitcoin, so you should always keep your private keys in your control. There are multiple ways to do that, such as hardware wallets, or keeping it in your laptop, mobile phone, etc.
Liquidity
Another problem with many exchanges are lack of liquidity, which means when one wants to withdraw a big chunk of bitcoin, for example,1000 BTC at current price is about $17 Million, exchanges don’t have that much cash available and ready to move, and therefore the entire BTC market can fluctuate in seconds.
Accessibility
There is no such thing as an instant in these exchanges as you have to first verify (KYC and AML) your account which can take 10 minutes to 3 days depending on your region. Only after such long waiting you can transfer real cash from your bank account, but that is also unlikely, because many local banks are not supporting these kinds of exchanges. The solution to this problem is to buy using an escrow mechanism and get crypto in the same region where one pays using local currency in the same region, such service provider being known as LocalBitcoins.
Support
Another approach to the above mentioned problem is to reduce the cost of switch for traders, so the users can convert token to token without leaving the wallet. It is only in decentralized exchanges which lacks support for a commodity, ease of use and overall lacks user support.
Due to financial transaction exchanges were always under scrutiny, Bittrex came under radar for an incident in which a handful of user documents merged into one support ticket and released in a public forum.
Once again, there is no support when you do not understand something of the website of the exchange or you need to know certain things about the fees. So, you will have to create the support ticket yourself and wait for the answer an hour depending on the volume of tickets. The support system of exchanges is dingy and the company like ‘Coinbase’ does not even have a live chat or a phone number where one can call and get help.
Manipulation
Cryptocurrencies are speculative and bound to manipulation - there have been many incidents on these central exchanges where “Spoofing” is seen. With ‘spoofing’, one puts large buy or sell orders driving traders in one direction and then cancels the order before execution. This implies that anyone who can gain access to trading with large amount of BTC can drive prices to go crazy.
As a precaution many exchanges are locking down a number of accounts if any suspicious activity seen, resulting in distress within the community and customers. Similar incidents reported by community, where whenever ‘Tether’ currency denomination released on Blockchain, there was a sudden surge in the value of the Bitcoin. ‘Tether’ is a cryptocurrency which backed by $1 and it is one of the subsidiary of ‘Bitfinex’. ‘Bitfinex’ banking relationship jeopardized due to a DDOS hack. This gives rise to the question: is Tether a cryptocurrency or just a scam. Newcomers to Blockchain may notice the irony — in an industry obsessed with decentralization, some of the biggest exchanges are centralized, trusted institutions.
Future
“Decentralized exchanges are the way of the future,” said Hugh Madden, technical director for ‘openANX’, a decentralized exchange infrastructure protocol. With the new model in decentralised exchanges you have no order book — buy and sell orders are matched peer-to-peer. There is no central authority where hackers can attack and drain money.
Exchanges have to address these problems in future:
  1. Accessible - faster KYC process , international banking support and integration.
  2. End-to-End Security – Exchanges need to scale , better security for customers to their own data centers.
  3. Cold Storage – Storing all bitcoins, cryptocurrency in cold storage reduces the risk of hacking coins.
  4. Technology Architecture – Right now the exchange architecture is straightforward and the insecure REST API exposed to the world. Using service such as Apache Kafka can reduce I/O throughput.
  5. Banking – The banks do not understand cryptocurrency, if the exchanges want to stay, they have to work together with the bank to provide full transparency within the system .
  6. Liquidity – Right now every exchange lacks liquidity,one of the solution to this problem could be the introducing of new services - for example, the user can spend coins from the exchange for some service or asset.
  7. Easy – It is easy to use.
These protocols are still in development phase, but as we continue to see the threats on centralised exchanges, it is imminent that decentralised exchanges will take over. The answer lies in technology development and complete use of tokens.
In conclusion, as a crypto user one has to be very careful what exchanges they are dealing with and make sure the exchange has a valid banking setup or relationship, verification process and resolution mechanism and meets all the terms and conditions; make sure also, that in case of hack or solvency, you will get your money back or at least a part of it .
Do your own research before engaging in the cryptocurrency space.
submitted by tradxwrite to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

The official bitshares client will be able to send and receive bitcoin from next week! Decentralized bitcoin hedging is here!

I've heard from a bitshares core dev that the shapeshift API will be integrated directly in the official bitshares full node possibly as early as next week, and will also be included in the light wallet (still in beta). This is huge for both bitcoin and bitshares!
This means that you can now use BitShares as a decentralized hedged bitcoin wallet. You can receive bitcoins from an exchange or from your friends, and hold it in bitUSD, and then send it out again to a bitpay integrated merchant, or lighthouse, or a bitcoin debit card or wherever else you want. All done exactly the same way as you send bitcoins normally using normal bitcoin addresses, except that while you hold the bitcoins they are hedged against volatility so if you send in 100 USD worth of bitcoin you will be able to send out 100 USD worth of bitcoin as well at any point in the future. All this is done without counterparty risk, you hold your own private keys at all times, and you need zero AML, zero anti-terrorism anal probes, and there's no way your money can be seized or frozen - just like bitcoin was always meant to be.
It's this kind of feature that is going to make bitcoin go mainstream. If anyone can hold and use bitcoins without having to worry about volatility we will begin to see an increasing amount of people shifting their money into crypto. As bitcoin is the onramp and offramp for all cryptocurrency, and is the payment rails on which cryptocurrency will be spent, the more money that goes into crypto as a whole the more bitcoin benefits. Bitcoin is already the most convenient way to spend your money in the whole world, with the addition of decentralized volatility hedging by consumers there's no reason why all commerce shouldn't go through the bitcoin network. BitUSD itself will never be a threat to bitcoin as a payments system. No merchant is ever going to accept BitUSD since it's so much easier to accept bitcoin since it has all the infrastructure and enables you to accept bitUSD as well, so bitcoin and bitUSD will never have to compete, but can instead grow side by side.
I know there's still going to be plenty of people who insists that bitUSD is a shitcoin and is useless for anything, but i hope some people will be able to realize that it is something that complements bitcoin rather than competes with it, since it will never be able to match the branding and network effect of bitcoin, but can help with consumer adoption.
As the USD starts to seriously tank it will also be possible to hedge your bitcoins to other assets, such as gold (using bitgold), so until bitcoin itself has become big enough to remove volatility there will be plenty of options to enable people to use it without volatility concerns.
The BitShares ecosystem also has a lot more to offer bitcoin as well. Bitshares has blockchain registered names that are compatible with bitcoin addresses (because bitshares uses the same type of private keys as bitcoin), so in the future we might be able to send bitcoins to human readable names instead of incomprehensible public keys, another important step that will help with mainstream adoption.
Another thing are the paid delegates. Bitshares' "miners" get paid a salary in order to improve and develop the system and blockchain. But as bitshares begins to have more money at the disposal of delegates this method of funding can also begin to benefit bitcoin (since bitcoin adoption and merchant acceptance benefits bitshares directly). Instead of having the bitcoin foundation controlling the bitcoin core developers, some of the core developers could be bitshares delegates and be funded in a completely decentralized manner in order to protect and grow both ecosystems. If the cryptocurrency space (and thus also bitshares) grows enough to afford it we could also see things like lighthouse delegates that use their delegate pay to support open source lighthouse projects that benefits both ecosystems - systems like bitsquare are the future for all cryptocurrencies and it is important they are well funded if we are to succeed.
Finally there's the decentralized exchange itself, which is what BitShares was always meant to be (the whole concept was in fact conceived by the lead dev after mtgox had its funds seized in 2013). It's still not widely used, but bitshares has a bitasset for bitcoin as well, called bitBTC. With BitBTC you can trade the price of BTC and USD directly on the blockchain without any sort of counterparty risk, and as soon as you want real bitcoin again you can convert them instantly through a gateway like meta-exchange or shapeshift (if they add bitBTC in the future). The hope is that one day all bitcoin trade can be done entirely without centralized institutions, making the entire cryptocurrency ecosystem completely immune from ben lawsky and regulatory crackdown.
One last thing before someone calls me out on it, regarding the counterparty risk. Since shapeshift has momentary control of your funds it isn't actually completely free from counterparty risk, however the risk is greatly reduced from other systems like coinbase, bitstamp or paypal that just hold all your funds outright. The worst shapeshift can do is to steal the volume they process over a period of time until the community is alerted. Because the payoff is so low you can be guaranteed it will never happen (assuming they seek profit). Lets assume they take 0.1% fees and will be able to steal 1 hours worth of volume before people stop sending them money (there will likely be automatic alert systems in the wallets making the time significantly less). This means that they will at best be able to steal 40 days worth of income, but lose all future income as a result. It should be obvious that this will never be worth it, especially considering the fixed costs they have put into establishing the business.
submitted by Rune4444 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Multiple € exchanges on one price graph

I'm looking for something like http://www.skami.net/ but for EUR. I'd like to see price chart for euro for mtgox, bitcoin.de and btc-e, all on one chart. Does it exist somewhere?
If not, do exchanges offer only current prices through an API, or are there historical prices also? I mean, does bitcoincharts.com have to query each exchange every few minutes, or can they get historical prices through an API?
submitted by dijxtra to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Hi r/Bitcoin! I made a simple Android app I think you might like :)

So for a while now I've been trying to find a basic Android app to display the real-time price (in large text) of bitcoin in several different currencies. I've got a spare android phone and wanted to use it as a dedicated ticker. My searching didn't turn up anything so I ended up writing it myself. I call it Bitpulse and it taps into the MtGox streaming API. Every currency that the API supports is supported in the app. Oh and it's free too!
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ericbarch.bitpulse
Would love your feedback and your thoughts...hope you like it!
submitted by ericbarch to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Introducing BIPS – The Free EWallet and Merchant Solutions Provider

Bitcoin Internet Payment System (BIPS), the free Bitcoin service, has just launched. BIPS unleashes the full power of Bitcoin - making merchant processing fees a thing of the past and giving traditional payment processors a run for their money. Created for merchants and end users alike, the Bitcoin world will never be the same. Based out of Denmark, BIPS is brought to you by the same team as WalletBit - a name you can trust. Visit https://bips.me and get started today.
Users have the option of signing up using an existing Facebook, Twitter or Google account. This means you won't have to remember another password unless you want to. For those of you who like to do things the old fashioned way, we have a traditional sign up method.
Our free eWallet service is the most secure in existence today. When you sign up for a BIPS account your password is stored as a heavily salted SHA-512 hash. This means your BIPS password is more secure than most banking sites. BIPS also enables you to add up to three factors of authentication to prevent unauthorized access to your account. This includes Secure Card technology pioneered by WalletBit and Google Authenticator.
BIPS is the first major Bitcoin gateway to offer merchant tools completely for free. As long as you keep your balance as Bitcoins then you pay zero processing fees. You only have to pay if you want to cash out to your local currency.
BIPS gives you the option to automatically convert some of or all the Bitcoins coming into your account to your local currency. Any automatic conversion to local currency at the time of purchase is guaranteed at the rate it was processed for. This means you can accept Bitcoins without worrying about exchange rates.
Transfers between BIPS accounts are instant and free. The only thing you will ever be asked to pay for are our premium services such as buying, selling and cold storage. BIPS offers the most affordable Bitcoin selling rates ever offered globally. With 42 different local currency options (https://bips.me/pricing) BIPS offers the most cash out options anywhere. This includes daily domestic transfers to both Canada and Denmark.
BIPS combines years of Bitcoin processing experience to create the ultimate Bitcoin website. Best of all BIPS is free. Simply put, BIPS is the last Bitcoin website you will ever need.
Free Bitcoin Services
eWallet services (only pay network fees!) - Receive Bitcoin - Send Bitcoin - Transfer between BIPS accounts - Import wallet.dat
Bitcoin Merchant Tools - Instant Payment Notifications (IPN) - REST API - Shopping Cart Plug-ins (coming soon) - Mobile Checkout
Premium Bitcoin Services - Sell Bitcoin (2.5%) - Buy Bitcoin (9%) - MTGox Instant Ask (0.89%) - SMS Bitcoin (0.89%) - Cold Storage (0.89%/0.89%)
https://bips.me
submitted by WalletBit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Is it possible that some arbitrage happens secretly between exchanges ?

Seeing huge gaps between prices on MtGox and BTC-e (or any other exchange company), is it possible that both platforms have an agreement on cooperating to make some arbitrage. One buy cheap bitcoins, make a transfer to the other to sell higher and each month the later sends back half of the gains. Is there something preventing this ? Would the prices self-regulate as it would if the arbitrage was done by users ? I guess that all charts are verified against the blockchain. If not, the APIs values could be based on some agreement too. I should be wrong on everything here, but I would be glad to understand why.
submitted by MrPapillon to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

MtGox Bitcoins To BTC Bitcoins - YouTube BTC Trader API configuration Bitcoin Trading - Streaming Live Bitcoin prices through Exchange API MtGox Bitcoins to BTC Bitcoins in 50 seconds BITCOIN PRICE BREAKOUT! $20k possible? MT Gox Bitcoin ...

Am gestrigen Mittwoch, dem 07. März, wurden Details zum Verkauf der Konkursmasse der bankrotten Krypto-Exchange Mt. Gox bekannt gegeben. Demnach veräußerte der Insolvenzverwalter Bitcoin und Bitcoin Cash im Wert von mehr als 400 Millionen US-Dollar. Die Geschichte der Bitcoin-Börse Mt.Gox hat in der Krypto-Welt einen Erdrutsch ausgelöst. Innerhalb kürzester Zeit ist die Plattform zur weltweit größten Krypto-Börse aufgestiegen – dann kam der Crash. Die Bilanz: verprellte Kunden, verschwundene Bitcoin, Insolvenzverfahren und viele offene Fragen. Wir zeichnen die unrühmliche Geschichte der Börse nach und fragen nach dem aktuellen ... This here is a bitcoin ticker app it shows the MTGox bitcoin price with a small lag and is self refreshing. It also supports GBP, EUR and Yen. This is the link to the blog post It also supports GBP, EUR and Yen. In the "old API", currency- and amount-values (price, volume,...) were given as float. These values are likely being deprecated and replaced by fields of the same name with "_int" as suffix. These are fixed-decimal, so you have to move the decimal point yourself (divide). The exponent differs based on the kind of the value. In order to convert the int to a decimal you can... kind of field ... The MtGox API provides methods to access information from the market, ... Contents. 1 Number Formats; 2 Currency Symbols; 3 Date and time; 4 See Also; Number Formats. In the "old API", currency- and amount-values (price, volume,...) were given as float. These values are likely being deprecated and replaced by fields of the same name with "_int" as suffix. These are fixed-decimal, so you have ...

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MtGox Bitcoins To BTC Bitcoins - YouTube

3. Transferring 23.23 USD from MtGox to BTC-e via Bitinstant (1.49% fee). 4. Receiving 22.89 USD on BTC-e Bitcoin exchange. 5. Buying new Bitcoins for a price of 11.40 USD/BTC getting 2.0037 BTC ... MtGox Bitcoins to BTC Bitcoins in 50 seconds BITCOIN PRICE , BITCOIN FUTURE in doubt http://youtu.be/eO-yrpQpIT8 What is NAMECOIN BITCOIN'S First Fork http:/... BTC-Trader - the first Windows trading client with GUI for MtGox users In this video the API configuration of BTC-Trader (http://www.myBTC-Trader.com) is sho... Bitcoin Price Analysis! China Financial Crisis! - Duration: 10:45. That Martini Guy 4,809 views. 10:45. Watch CNBC's full interview with Jeffrey Gundlach - Duration: 27:27. ... More MtGox fishy scammery... This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue

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